Proper placement of mouthpiece on lips

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by eviln3d, Aug 26, 2013.

  1. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    I think the 50/50 is a good starting place, and the embouchure will naturally find itself being a 60/40 or 40/60 or whatever the longer she plays. As long as the director sees it as a starting point and not dogma things should work out.
     
  2. robrtx

    robrtx Mezzo Forte User

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    I think that I could put the mouthpiece anyplace at the outset of playing, but after five minutes it will "find" the same position it always does which is roughly 70 top/ 30 bottom, and left of center.

    Interestingly, if I play to the point that I leave an impression in my lips and then look in the mirror, the top/bottom semi circles don't line up, indicating that I "shift" my bottom lip a touch to center when I actually play, so effectively I play more off center on my bottom lip, than my top lip!
     
  3. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    There is a cool book from Charles Collins called Chops. It had hundreds of pictures of brass players embouchure, all of whom were pros. Out of the bunch of pictures there were just a handful of players with a picture perfect embouchure. It is a shame so many top-flight brass players are playing wrong! (tee-hee!)
     
  4. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    IMO, by what you write, if you are producing circle impressions when you play, you are utilizing too much left elbow pressure pushing the instrument into your lips. In all ranges you need only sufficient movement of your lips to the mouthpiece to make an air seal.
     
  5. robrtx

    robrtx Mezzo Forte User

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    Could very well be. Although to play to this point for me generally means that I have "over done" it. I will definately take the pressure tip into account.
     
  6. bigtiny

    bigtiny Mezzo Forte User

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    I get so tired of these misinformed, opinionated bozos.

    - you're right. Everybody's body and mouth are different. There's almost NO PHYSICAL ASPECT of playing the trumpet that is set in stone. Why people can't get this through their heads is a mystery to me. I love to see people look at players with 'perfect' embochures (if it works, it's perfect) and ohhh and ahhh. I remember when I was a kid, my uninformed family used to tell me how impressive it was for a guitar player to play and "not have to look at the frets...." Uhhh, yeah, and they were talking about bad players playing bad music...I digress....

    - a 'standard' for some things, like mouthpiece placement, might be a good to have as a starting point for a beginner, but it really shouldn't be that big a deal....

    - if I was going to start out a student, I'd suggest 60 (bottom) 40 (top) not 50/50.

    bigtiny
     
  7. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Hi Eviln,
    Be sure your kid is telling you the facts. You might need to speak with the "band director" to make sure your child didn't get confused about what he was trying to say. As for me and my daughter, She knows that if a situation like that were to arise, she knows to say "You'll first need to pass this idea by my trumpet instructor.
    The task of "Band Director" and "Trumpet Instructor" are profoundly different. If she has a private instructor then he needs to back-off with the trumpet advice. The rest of my thoughts are in the PM I sent.
    Hope this helps and good luck!!
    Dr.Mark
     
  8. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Hi VB,
    Without pulling out an abacus or a slide rule, did you notice what the basic mouthpiece placement was in Charles Collins book Chops? I'm guessing that the greater portion of the lip to the mouthpiece is the bottom lip.
    Dr.Mark
     
  9. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    "Over done" is generally a time the elbow pressure increases I've found, but "over done" is an inclusive for a lot of error, my own is a loss of tone.
     

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