Proper placement of mouthpiece on lips

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by eviln3d, Aug 26, 2013.

  1. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    The more "appropriate" emoticon would have been the "rolling eyes" :roll: or the "rofl" ROFL. Some of us are touchy with the parent/director relationship because in many systems, the music education has become secondary and the "feelings" of the "angels" is a priority. We don't want to offend anybody by telling them they are wrong. The director I mentioned previously used to have his 6th & 7th grade bands playing Kenton/Herman/Ellington arrangements for spring concerts. With political correctness run amok, grades 1 & 2 are the best (and it wasn't good) he could get the kids to do. He retired 4 years early!
     
  2. eviln3d

    eviln3d Pianissimo User

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    Sorry, I always thought the rolling eyes were for when you didn't believe what someone said, and didn't think it would be polite to laugh at my own joke, so I didn't.
     
  3. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    I often find I have to laugh at my own jokes just to be sure they get at least one laugh.


    --bumblebee
     
  4. bigtiny

    bigtiny Mezzo Forte User

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    I can only comment on the information that I get here. Taken at face value, the band director's attitude is that of a bozo, and a bozo that apparently knows little about brass playing. I never meant to imply that all band directors are morons anyway, I meant to imply that anyone in a position of responsibility toward teaching a brass player, who displays this kind of attitude and lack of knowledge, is indeed, a bozo....

    bigtiny
     
  5. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    You can make that 2 now. :D
     
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  6. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    Thanks - but just to let you know that wasn't actually a joke.

    When I did try and tell jokes as a child my Dad would ask me to pass the feather.

    --bumblebee
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I guessed I missed it. Why is the director any more or less of a moron than the others with their "own" ideas about embouchures?

    Parents are not ALWAYS right until the teacher PROVES that they are not guilty.
     
  8. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    I'm suspicious of any dogma except my own....
     
  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I'm suspicious of my dog.
     
  10. Comeback

    Comeback Forte User

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    I suppose I shouldn't even be posting. I am late to this thread and quite frankly got worn out before I finished reading the seven pages of posts. But, eviln3d, your OP presented topics of importance on several levels.

    Do you know why your daughter has now decided to play trumpet? Might it be because of the band director? If this is the case, you could easily end up discouraging your daughter's musical interests by opposing the director concerning embouchure.

    You know, unless I miss my guess there are other prudent brass-wind teachers that preach "centered 50/50". This is an idea with at least a shred of legitimacy for beginners. I sort of wish my first director had a clue in this regard. I began with an off-centered embouchure with the horn projecting at an odd angle from my face. I developed this mess of an embouchure not for any good reason, like dental conditions or jaw structure. It came about because of applying way too much pressure and too much eagerness to "make a noise". It limited me throughout my early years and only disaapeared as a result of years away from the horn and a strong desire to do things right the second time around.

    My wife and I reared three sons, none of whom pursued interests as musicians like their mother and I did. All had the opportunity, but we did not pressure them. Your daughter, on her own, has now decided to play trumpet. How cool is that! This presents you with a big challenge; that being expressing the right amount of interest and support while providing her plenty of room to make this adventure her own. Best wishes in this exciting endeavor for both of you.

    Jim
     
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