Proper placement of mouthpiece on lips

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by eviln3d, Aug 26, 2013.

  1. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    I too read all of the input of this thread, and conclude with one thought ... fewer than 1% of all beginning students of instrumental music continue to play beyond high school ... if they stay that long (and it doesn't really matter which instruments they play). Even with college musical degrees, even less pursue a career as professional musicians and there is an interplay of economics in this circumstance vis there are not that many positions with sustainable income. The back-up is that some then teach, but have lost their inspiration and incentive ... succinctly about just letting a student fend for themselves from the books ... and therewith is the culprit relatedly to a brass instrument ... the illustration of a 50/50 placement of the mouthpiece on the lips ... being thus considered the only right way to play.
     
  2. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Gunther Schuller was once asked why America has so many brass players playing in European orchestras. His answer was Marching Band. Social Darwinism--any player that can survive the kind of beating chops take on the field and still play with finesse is bound to be good.
     
  3. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    In Northern winters at football games, I won't dispute this ... especially with a metal mouthpiece. and it was H**l following in winter concert and Christmas caroling, the latter when snow often obliterated the music that was only half memorized, but some of the carols were finessed.
     
  4. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but learning the trumpet is not fun. My view is that fun is something that is not learned. Pleasure is. What I tried to teach parents and students is that attention to trumpet creates an upward spiral. We practice to get good, we enjoy playing more when we sound good, and so we practice more. Eventually, like running, or a myriad of other disciplines, trumpet playing becomes addicting, an obsessive compulsion on the part of the player.
     

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