puffing the upper lip?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by BAM, Nov 14, 2003.

  1. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    He puffed his cheeks, not his lip. Puffing of the lip is not forgiving as it is for the cheeks. Different anatomical parts for different physiological functions. This thread is specific to the lips.
     
  2. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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  3. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    The "Pooh" word lip formation, or a Botox injection isn't ideal to play a brass instrument I agree. However, I don't believe Dizzy's puff were limited to his cheeks and did not also inflate the space in front of his teeth to some extent. Try to puff your cheeks and not the space in front of your teeth to some degree. I dare you!

    By this, I'm not sayin' that such inflation in front of the teeth is extreme, but I note no problem with what I personally do.

    However, I concur that playing a brass instrument relys mostly on the lips and BREATH.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2012
  4. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    Yeah -- I agree with you Ed, I think it is quite impossible to puff the cheeks without drawing the lips out a bit ---- Hey where is TrumpetMD???? we want a 2nd opinion!!!!!!!!!!!!! ROFL ROFL ROFL
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Dizzy's damage was isolated to the buccinator muscles in his cheeks. Here is a medical discription I found searching our medical library: Musicians who play wind instruments rely on using the buccinators to produce the right sound, especially in the case of brass players. What is known as the embouchure, or the way in which the tongue and lips are held to the mouthpiece to produce musical notes, depends largely upon the relative tensions between the buccinators and the lip muscles. The famous jazz trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie appeared to have stretched his buccinator muscles to such an extent that his cheeks became hugely distended while playing. In this situation the lip muscles are separate from the cheek muscle structure by insertion points. The two conditions did NOT exist together in Dizzy's case, just as Louis Armstrongs lips in Sachmo Syndrome was only isolated to his lips.
     
  6. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    GMONADY and others, there is no disagreement in lay terms that the facial muscles help in forming the oral cavity and support the lips. In Satchmo I believe we are looking at a natural and yet not uncommon lip formation and again his sound was great.

    When I write of filling the space in front of my teeth it was less than 5/16th with my teeth before my full upper denture and lower partial and now may be only 3/16th, but I still feel it's cushion when I'm playing. Otherwise, my current problem is the pursuit of strengthening my total embouchure in recovery and that does include some modification to acclimate to the dentures.
     
  7. Haste2

    Haste2 Piano User

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    I thought I was the only one who puffs my upper lip. It used to be quite common for me. However, it rarely (if ever?) happens with me, anymore, for some reason.... I guess it's because I've been working on my general bad habits of playing.
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    That is the reason. I hope others here with that situation takes your lead.
     
  9. 9horn

    9horn Pianissimo User

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    Chet Baker puffed the upper lip, may have had someting to do with his airy sound?
     

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