Purtle Brass Camp

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by applebrass, Jul 12, 2011.

  1. applebrass

    applebrass New Friend

    14
    1
    Mar 25, 2011
    I just attended the second annual Purtle Brass Camp held at Anderson University in Anderson, South Carolina this past Thursday - Saturday, July 7 - 9th and want to report that it was a great success and a I had a great time. Participants came from as far away as Portugal, California, Pennsylvania, and New York. The featured guests were Carl Lenthe (trombone and low brass) and Harry Kim (trumpet). Just google these guys if you don't believe me that they are terrific and really at the top of the game. Check out purtle.com for more information and no, Jeff didn't put me up to making this post and I am not even one of his students. I just think it was a great event and would like more people to know about it and plan to come next year. I now have many new trumpet-playing friends as a result of my attendance and hope to continue to make new ones in the coming years.
     
  2. The Kraken

    The Kraken Piano User

    271
    5
    Mar 28, 2007
    Gold Coast - 805
    That is great!!

    Just wish I could have been there.............

    Anybody else here go to this camp? Please share your experiances would love to read about them, what you saw? who you talked too? what information was an eye openner?
     
  3. applebrass

    applebrass New Friend

    14
    1
    Mar 25, 2011
    I don't know that there was any eye opening information for me but it was really neat to stand nearby Harry Kim while he tried some of the vendors' trumpets. Fred Powell was there with several custom designed trumpets that he was able to instantly change out a lead pipe or tuning slide. Fred does some things internal to the tuning slides that can change the trumpet's reflection points. Harry would play one and name what he liked and didn't like about the horn, then Fred would change out the tuning slide and Harry would try it and say that he liked that configuration better. That was really cool to watch. Dr. Larry Miller, a medical doctor, presented "The Diaphragmatic Breathing Fallacy" with photos of actual diaphragms that was pretty interesting and Jeff Purtle presented some information on using Claude Gordon routines to solve some problems. For instance, when playing Clarke's Technical Studies #34 in D major use alternate fingerings (1,2,3 for F#, 1,3 for G) so that your first valve stays pressed for the entire exercise and only the second and third finger are moving. Try it and you will be surprised how much easier it is than using conventional fingering. Also when playing #36 in E major use alternate fingerings (3 for E and 3 for A) so that the first valve is never pressed and once again the only fingers that move are the second and third. Probably the best thing though was the opportunity to make new friends in the trumpet world. I was thrilled to make the acquaintance of Peter Voisin (I hope he doesn't mind me dropping his name) the son of the legendary Roger Voisin, who I used to listen to on public radio when I was a teenager in the 60's and 70's. Nine times out of ten, whenever you heard a trumpet concerto on public radio, the soloist was Roger Voisin. So it was really neat to talk with Peter about his dad.
     

Share This Page