Question about accompanying vocalists

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Ocdlaw, Oct 26, 2015.

  1. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Anyway it's done, whether you are accompanying someone or someone is accompanying you, the criteria is as many rehearsals as it takes with both of you to get it the way it should be performed. Hymns are usually slower than other music and often very emotional. A point: breathe when the vocalist breathes.
     
  2. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Harmon mute or cup mute and LOTS of practice with the singer. And just remember that it's about the singer, she's delivering the message.
     
  3. edfitzvb

    edfitzvb Forte User

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    Lots of questions in my mind here:

    1.) What is the singer's vocal range? Alto would lend itself more to cornet or flugel.
    2.) Are microphones involved or is everything acoustic? If there are microphones, then a mute is solely for color, not volume
    3.) Is it JUST horn and vocal? Are there other instruments?
    4.) What is the proficiency level of each performer?
    5.) How many selections are we talking about, and what is the style? tempo? mood?

    All of these factors would influence any input I could give.
     
  4. edfitzvb

    edfitzvb Forte User

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    Actually, it's not ALL about the singer. The horn has an important voice also. Perhaps another way to state it would be: Be in agreement with each other. Don't play a line that is not congruent with the singer's stylings. Above all, remember... It's not just the notes you play. The notes you don't play also shape the song
     
  5. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    I totally agree, but having worked with, ah, um, "vocalist" in the past in church, the vocalist will get really upset if they feel they are being overshadowed. I was trying to save the player some grief. ;-)ROFL
     
  6. edfitzvb

    edfitzvb Forte User

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    Yeah.. There are musicians and then there are singers.....
     
  7. Newell Post

    Newell Post Piano User

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    Flugelhorn or cornet with deep mouthpiece and a cup mute, if you are truly accompanying an alto soloist.

    Now if she was a soprano.....
     
  8. J. Jericho

    J. Jericho Fortissimo User

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    FWIW - I'd play open (no mute), relatively softly, with a full, round tone, and pretty much match the range of the singer. I'd try to enhance her timbre and focus on harmonics. I'd also work out a give-and-take/question-and-answer response with her phrases to fill in some of her pauses, especially considering the genre of the music.
     
  9. larry newman

    larry newman Piano User

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    not a straight mute...it's not jazz, and definitely does not need an edge. Mellow is the key...cup mute, harmon with stem out, larger horn...flugel.
     
  10. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    I use a Soulo brand bucket mute with a handkerchief in it when I need to tone the trumpet right down for a vocalist (or quiet hymn) - or sometimes my copper bubble/harmon mute without the stem. Otherwise I use a flugelhorn and play as mellow as I can.

    --bumblebee
     

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