Question about "blow"? Uh, not that kind!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by RonD, Jul 23, 2014.

  1. RonD

    RonD Pianissimo User

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    Ontario, Canada
    Hi all,

    2nd dumb comebacker question.

    I tried to search this, to no avail.
    Why does one horn with, let's say a .460 bore, feel more stuffy than another horn of the same bore?
    I want an "easy playing" horn. Wouldn't everyone??

    I'll add more questions if anyone answers.

    Cheers, Ron
     
  2. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Not sure that stuffiness is anything to do with bore.

    Often a poor instrument, poor mouthpiece match for the instrument, or a small foreign body stuck somewhere in the tubing.
     
  3. sj3209

    sj3209 Piano User

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    Dirt. Valves misaligned. Bad design. Cheap design (same thing usually). Mismatch between the horn and mouthpiece. Bad player. Good player playing bad. Player using technique not appropriate for the set up of horn/MP. Some dork left something stuck in the mellophone after that last performance (wasn't me). Next?
     
  4. RonD

    RonD Pianissimo User

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    Thanks Seth and sj3209.

    I will definitely agree with the poor/cheap instrument. A rental horn, for a couple of months, so I can have enough chops to actually try some horns.
    Bad player... OK, you got me!
    The rental is an Eastman 252? Today I played a Yamaha rental 23..?? and a rather beat up Jupiter. Quite a difference in "ease of playing.
    I was using a Yamaha Bobby Shew Jazz mouthpiece.
     
  5. trumpetguy27

    trumpetguy27 Mezzo Piano User

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    There are almost infinitely many factors that contribute to the blow of a horn... aside from the obvious blockages and poor alignment etc mentioned but one of the biggest is actually mouthpiece fitment and the amount of gap between the end of the mouthpiece and the beginning of the leadpipe in the receiver. Other things like leadpipe design and shape of tuning slide etc also contribute.

    One other note is that not everyone wants or likes a horn that blows very free and easy... an example is that some lead players prefer a horn with a bit of resistance to blow "against" in the upper register stuff.

    Hope that helps some!
     
  6. RonD

    RonD Pianissimo User

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    Jun 22, 2014
    Ontario, Canada
    It does.
    Is there a measurement for optimum gap?
     
  7. trumpetguy27

    trumpetguy27 Mezzo Piano User

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    Well that's mostly an opinion type thing but if you're around a tenth to an eigth of an inch you're probably pretty good. Some guys with some MPs will actually go very close to or at zero gap and some will go out to a quarter or so.... but that gives a good starting point. You can play with this some using a small piece of paper wrapped around your MP shank before inserting. This will increase your gap and give a feel of what I'm talking about.
     
  8. RonD

    RonD Pianissimo User

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    Jun 22, 2014
    Ontario, Canada
    Thanks Scott.
     
  9. trumpetguy27

    trumpetguy27 Mezzo Piano User

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    No problem! By the way... take a look here... it gives a pretty good quick rundown on Gap: GAP CHEK
     
  10. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Most of the time stuffy has nothing to do with the horn. Take your instrument into the bathroom and play a couple of notes. The horn feels lively and free blowing. Take the same horn and go outdoors where there are no buildings or other things to reflect the sound -the same horn feels stuffy.

    This is the secret. It almost never is the hardware. Temperature, humidity all affect what we perceive.

    That being said, the next major reason is the basic sound of the instrument. We all hear differently and there are sounds that our brain can more easily understand. In certain rooms bright sounding horns have an advantage, in others darker sound communicate better.

    I wish that we would get off of this stupid hardware trip. Gap has essentially nothing to do with "free blowing". The same applies to bore size.

    If we analyse what free blow means to most: my air is not impeded. Hmmm, shouldn't we be looking at our chops first? Most of play with too much pressure. That means that we clamp off our lips. Getting a less efficient horn (same sound/more air) will make us apply even more pressure. Exactly the opposite of what we are trying to accomplish.

    I am not saying that there is not any difference in the way horns blow, I am saying that that has NOTHING to do with what "weaker" players think that they want.

    The solution is not new hardware before we have identified the real problem. The brainless way is to blame hardware. For comeback players without a regular daily routine and at least 30-60 minutes a day of intelligent practice, hardware is pure placebo. Save your money. Practice after a hot shower (I am serious). You are far more relaxed and that essentially guarantees a free blow.

    Before someone mentions it, forget about drilling out the mouthpiece. It simply screws up the intonation and ends up being harder to play than before.

    For players with well developed chops, this issue almost never comes up because they have the power in their face and the freedom from harware dependencies.
     

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