Question about Double C

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by bach37, Apr 19, 2012.

  1. ozboy

    ozboy Mezzo Forte User

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    I made a full time living out of trumpet for about 15 years. I play the jazz chair in a big band, read OK and a lot of small ensemble stuff. Chasing a Super C has never interested me. I have worked with guys that can play one to varying degrees. There is only one gig I remember where the lead had to play over a G. Happy for others to play the screamers though.
     
  2. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    I was trying to use really simple phrases. I know I was confused when I learned about this, so I explained it with really simple terms.

    From what I was told, each part in the bell resonates at a different note. It gets farther up the bell with each note. The F is at the very end of the bell and any note higher will resonate outside of the horn. That is what I was told why the C is such a rare note, because some players cant get it to resonate outside the horn.
     
  3. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    I never heard the part about resonating "outside" the horn (sounds like physics or calculus to me :-(). I had read that F was the last "natural" note in the bell. Is it true? I can play a G and it's in the bell (I guess).
     
  4. Solar Bell

    Solar Bell Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes, most people who claim to have a Double C are blowing smoke. Can they squeak one out?, probably, almost anyone can.

    But can they HIT one, where written?

    Can they play one that stands out OVER the rest of the section, and over the whole band?

    No, they can not.

    Some people here who spew out "Advice", have ABSOLUTELY NO IDEA what they are talking about.

    They brag about their post total as if that means something.

    You don't have to answer every thread, and would get more respect if you only answered when you know what you're talking about!

    Think before you answer, no one cares about post totals.
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2012
  5. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Me neither. Life goes on.


    Turtle
     
  6. xjb0906

    xjb0906 Piano User

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    I am getting there. I am still at the stage where I can play up to a solid G above high C one day and hardly make it to high C the next. Occasionally an A will speak. My range up to Eb above high C stays pretty consistent until I start to try and see how high I can play. That is when I start having the trouble reaching up to high C. That's a good sign that I still don't know what I am doing up there and should back off for a while. The good news is that things are working more and more frequently above high C. The better news is that I am never called on to play up there. The highest I have been asked to play in a performance is a D above high C. More of us trumpet players need to focus more on being musicians instead of high note machines. I truly believe that range will come if you work on all aspects of your playing. It just takes time and patience.
     
  7. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    I'm not getting there ..... :-( ...... I'm stuck. But, I always play everything that I can do musically.

    Musicality trumps technicality. ;-)


    Turtle
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2012
  8. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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    I've been on my "comeback" journey for 12 months this week. For the last 10 months of that I have been playing in a couple local community bands.
    Mostly I play lead. I have only seen ONE double C written in a part, and even then it was marked "optional" (The Vax lick at the end of little minor booze)
    I have seen ONE high B just below the DHC... and it was just an 1/8th note kick in a mambo chart. It was also marked "optional".

    There have been a few A's actually written and one chart with a killer exposed monster G#.

    Most of the bazillion notes I have seen on my stand have been G or lower. The rest of the high stuff is optional, or infrequent.

    The thing is you really need to be a solid player between High C and G. You need to play in tune, with more finesse and less blastissimo. You need to swing and be consistent in your articulations and cut offs.

    If you can do that up to G's then you will be in alot better shape than a greasy sloppy player with a weak pinched off DHC. Too many guys burn all their calories worrying about higher and louder but never get good at playing the trumpet in the "meat and potatoes" register.
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2012
    tobylou8 likes this.
  9. Bogieboy

    Bogieboy Pianissimo User

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    I can occasionally squeak out that C........ But its rare... Musically my limit is a g or an a.... Anything above that just gets real airy and sound strained.... Now... With my Pic its a whole different story.....LOL
     
  10. Solar Bell

    Solar Bell Moderator Staff Member

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    THAT is the kind of player and attitude I want playing in MY swing band!
     

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