Question about "ringing sound"

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by ckkphoto, Jun 5, 2013.

  1. Bochawa!!!

    Bochawa!!! Forte User

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    ROFL Oh God!!! . . . I think I cracked a rib . . . snort.
     
  2. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I too love the brassier overtones of a trumpet that rings... like a Bach.
     
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I thought that too when I heard the overtones the resonated from your rib cage. Actually, I use a middle A tuning fork to diagnosis a rib fracture. Much more sensitive than a chest X-ray and a lot safer radiation.
     
  4. Bochawa!!!

    Bochawa!!! Forte User

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    I don't know why that struck me as so funny. I had just returned from rehearsal and was reading seriously through this thread when suddenly blind-sided by VB's dry wit. Really? With a tuning fork? How does that work?

    Man! I love those overtones when they start screaming. I only wish I could play some of those notes that I hear. I wonder, too, if anyone else can hear them, or if it's just me? Sometimes it's like having one or two more guys in the section.
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Along the lower boarder of our ribs, there is a groove that carries a nerve bundle from that particular level of the chest wall. If a rib is broken, there is a disconnect between the bone on both sides, meanwhile the nerve bundle (soft, pliable tissue) is spared and still lies within this groove. If however on side of the broken rib is vibrated, the other side across from the break remains fixed, such that the nerve bundle is vibrated against the fixed non-vibrating side of the rib, which irritates the nerve bundle. The patient feels this as an electrical shock, and will yell... OUCH!

    Man, I really LOVE medicine. Things are so simple to understand, and with this understanding, we can be creative. This is just about the best use of a tuning fork, which is one of many tools I carry in my little black bag.
     
  6. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    The more we home in on the resonant pitch centers on our trumpets the more we produce a full set of harmonics. This is a sign of progress in your playing.
     
  7. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    I had a king cornet 602 or 608 I can't remember the model. It had some weird overtones, I could also generate a high pitch whistle by blowing without buzzing. I think it was turbulence cause by a combination of horn and mouthpiece, and maybe Helmholtz resonance, caused by the air in the volume of the horn acting like a spring, which is subtly different than the traveling waves that form the primary tone. I think it made the horn sort of sour overall.
     
  8. ckkphoto

    ckkphoto Pianissimo User

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    I very much hope so! :roll:
     
  9. Angelajohn

    Angelajohn New Friend

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    I know the ringing sound may change because of the surrounding if you are playing this in a big hall so it's different as compare to your private room or where you do practice.
     
  10. ckkphoto

    ckkphoto Pianissimo User

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    I first noticed it with the practice mute IN so i doubt room acoustics are part of the picture. My daily routine includes ascending scale in soft long tones where I try to center my pitch. That is when I first noticed it. I actually appreciate all the input because I didn't know if I had picked up a bad habit. I checked both trumpets because I didn't know if the Strad -gasp- was damaged somehow.
     

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