Question about teachers

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by john7401, Jan 2, 2011.

  1. john7401

    john7401 Pianissimo User

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    I have always been under the impression, that all the adults that were good musicians in my life, that taught, understood the concept that everyone is unique and will learn (best) a certain way specific to them. However, in reality, what are the odds of me running into a teacher that would think and teach that way, or would simply try to work on me as if I was them, and they would attempt to fix all of my problems only the way they were able to fix theirs? What I'm really leading into is, what are the odds of finding a good teacher that will be able to help me specifically the way I need help? Or, is it REALLY better to do it oneself instead of hitting walls with a teacher that cannot help you because they only know what worked for them and it isn't working for you? In the end, if you are generally a smart person, why wouldn't doing it ourselves work? Who knows us better than ourselves? As long as one knows the bad habits, and proper habits, what is the need for a teacher really? Just some thoughts I hope you guys could help me with.
     
  2. s.coomer

    s.coomer Forte User

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    A teacher is always your best bet if you can find a good one. I do quite a bit of teaching and suggest different things for different people. I have worked with students for example with braces and I never had them. So what do I do? I go and read and research how best to work with a student with braces and have them continue to progress. Not everyone out there teaching thinks the way they did it is the only way.
     
  3. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    It all depends on how teachable you are. Start out by trying to emulate (copy) your teacher with the basic stuff. Basic stuff includes includes tonguing and slurring, flexibility and sound, rhythm and pitch. A good teacher will make suggestions on how best to do that, and those suggestions may sound esoteric at first. Persevere.

    If you are smart, you'll discover how to emulate your teacher. Having learned that lesson, you can easily learn to emulate other players. By doing so, you will have learned how to make the trumpet respond to your every whim. Then you can concentrate on making music.

    In the end, learning to play the trumpet is a DIY kind of thing, and one of the functions of a great trumpet teacher is to point out how stupid we are during the DIY process.

    This process is also known as "Paying our dues."

    Pay up, dude.
     
  4. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    john asks:
    As long as one knows the bad habits, and proper habits, what is the need for a teacher really?
    --
    There's only one person that can teach your brain, YOU.
    A teacher is simply there to guide you and inspire you.
    If you want to learn you will. If you don't, you won't.
     
  5. B15M

    B15M Forte User

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    In the beginning, everybody has to learn the same things. As you get better, the things you need to work on change.

    The problem with not having a teacher is that if you are doing something wrong, most likely you can't hear it. How can you fix what you can't hear?

    A teacher will listen and help you fix these things. A teacher will give you different ways to think about the same musical line. A teacher will hear from the other side of the bell. A teacher will inspire you to practice.

    Nobody is ever above getting advice. If someone gave Phil Smith advice on how to play something differently, I don't think he would pay for it, but I bet he would listen.

    If you want to teach yourself, my biggest suggestion is to record yourself. You will be surprised what you hear.
     
  6. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    B15M sez:
    The problem with not having a teacher is that if you are doing something wrong, most likely you can't hear it. How can you fix what you can't hear?
    ---
    Hopefully I'm taking to an adult who has a firm grasp on what it is to work and stick to a routine and get things done.
    The only thing B15M forgot was to say "Qualified Teacher".
    I'm of the firm belief that the only person that can teach you, is you.
    People are often drawn into the notion that "get a teacher" is the answer to many trumpet ills. To this I can only say that many people ask questions on this forum and many of them already have teachers.
    With that said, study the helpful tips on TM and take a hour or two session with a "qualified teacher"(at a university). The teacher can help you if you are tonguing wrong, breathing poorly, using too much mouthpiece pressure etc..
    Be sure to take paper and pencil to write stuff down. Once the session is over, take the info home and work on it a little every day.
    About six months down the road, make another appointment with the same person and see if they think you are improving.
    However, if you want to go the free route, there's a lot of info on TM that's worth learning.
    Hope this helps
     
  7. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    IMO, finding a qualified teacher that you get along with and helps you, is about the same odds as you would get throwing dice. Thus, I do believe many students who in time could have become very competent musicians now lanquish in the audience of others. I still think my public school band teacher / director made me a "winner".

    On the other hand, I am of the opinion that anyone who listens extensively to music and diligently practices all the lessons from such as Arbans will eventually find the joy in the music they produce themselves, whether or not they are paid to perform.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2011
  8. john7401

    john7401 Pianissimo User

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    Thanks guys. I needed alot of reconvincing after a long discussion about this. I'm unsure of my teachers abilities as far as teaching goes and even if he is a "qualified" teacher, I'm seeing that there DEFINTIELY has to be that trust involved for it to work out. I still have only had this one teacher so far for the past couple years, and unless I do get out there more and see what is out there I will never know what a good teacher is. As of now, I don't feel this teacher is a solid investment. I don't feel as if he is improving me more than if I was on my own at this point. In the begining he seemed to be improving my playing much more than now, yet, he still says he has a lot to teach me. I'm still not positive yet, but I'm really thinking its time to head to someone else.

    However, thank you for not letting me fall into that trap of the DIY
     
  9. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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  10. B15M

    B15M Forte User

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    As far as I'm concerned, based on this post, you and your teacher are done.

    Having a teacher is a very valuable tool. Having a teacher that you don't trust is worse than worthless. You will second guess everything.

    Find a teacher that you trust and value. When I go to a lesson, I can't believe that this guy is spending the time with me. I value every second.
    Sometimes when I practice, I can almost hear his voice telling me what to do.
     

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