Questions about Practicing

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by BPinard, Jun 16, 2005.

  1. BPinard

    BPinard Pianissimo User

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    Today, I just practiced for about 45 minutes. First, I used a warm-up sheet that my teacher wrote up, then I went to perfect my Bb scale. When I finished, I was having trouble hitting a high A (first ledger line) and my lips were tingling. Is it good that my lips tingle and that I couldn't play any higher? The highest I have ever played is a D (above high C).

    Thanks! :-)
     
  2. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    For me, when my lips are tingling, I can usually use it as an indicator that I worked them too hard without a break and was using a tad too much mouthpiece pressure. Resting is also an important part of trumpet practice and you want to make sure you build mini breaks in around your practice routines.

    In general, for me anyway, I find that my practices are best when I break things up into two or more sessions, the first session being a shorter warm-up session that only lasts 10 - 20 minutes, tops. That way, the lips and surrounding muscles get a chance to rest a bit and freshen up, yet they are also much more loose thanks to the warm-up and work for me much better after the rest.

    I recommend that you try some of these things - break your practices into smaller sessions, even as short as 15-20 minutes, and then set the horn down for a while, and come back to it later.
     
  3. trumpet blower88

    trumpet blower88 Mezzo Piano User

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    We just learned this past weekend thay many groups and people warm up to much. Actualy "warming up" takes about 10 seconds of mouthpice work, 10 seconds is just long enough to creat the swell inside your lips to be able to play. 99% of what most warmup excersizes are is getting your ear in tune and working on finding the center of the pitch. If you're warming up an ensemble, I can understand spending alot of time on this inorder to get your ensemble to play intune, but once i learned about this 10 second thing, I've spent less time "warming up" with just my individual practice sessions and I've noteiced that my range is increaseing and my endurance is skyrocketing, I used to warm up for 15 mins, and then only practice for 15 to 20 mins, but now I warm up for a min or two and practice for more than an hour!

    By the way, if you don't belive this 10 second thing... The tuba God Patrick Sheridon taught us this, so if you want to argue it, bring it up with him.
     
  4. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I disagree with the "10 seconds to warm up" thing. You won't ever find someone who works out, runs, whatever, only taking 10 seconds to warm up, but I do agree that some people do too much warm-up. I used to. I used to do a mini practice and found that I was half worn out before I played the first note of performance or practice. There needs to be a balance.

    I also think that part of warming up is not just the physical aspect of warming up - your focus and concentration needs to be put into gear too, but these are just my opinions.
     
  5. trumpet blower88

    trumpet blower88 Mezzo Piano User

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    Yeah, I agree with you there... I think thats what most of warming up really is...
     
  6. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I have to say that as I have gotten older, (wiser?) I don't put near the time into warming up that I used to - If I can't get it together in a few minutes, then I have bigger problems than my warm up routine! :lol:
     
  7. Musician4077

    Musician4077 New Friend

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    What about Philip Smith's idea of warmups? AKA, none?

    Jeff
     
  8. NickD

    NickD Forte User

    Warming up...

    When I was newer to the biz, I used to "warm up" WAAAYYY to much. I would get pooped out before I got to work!

    After about five minutes, I'm well into practicing, as far as I'm concerend, fwiiw.

    Also, the tingling thing, to me, is a red flag. Whenever I used to have that happen, I was just flat out pressing too hard. I'd make the warm up part a chance to get the focus going with the chops and with minimum mouthpiece pressure.

    Just MHO!

    Gotta run! Just got home from a session and I need to crash.

    Nick
     
  9. davidquinlan

    davidquinlan Pianissimo User

    Howard Snell will be releasing a new book later this year called "The Art of Practice".

    I'll post here again when it is available to purchase. I saw an early draft of the book and it will be will worth having. Howards other book, "The Trumpet" is also being released again.
     
  10. bandman

    bandman Forte User

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    I have learned a few things about warm-up over the years.

    1- It is different for every player.
    2- I personally do not need more that 10-15 seconds of warm-up. Toot a couple of notes and let's get on with the show.
    3- Most of warm-up is mental.
    4- Never hire trumpet players who need a long warm up for a church gig. They might play great at the beginning of the service, but if you have a long winded priest/preacher that same trumpet player who was great after a warm-up sucks when you play after just sitting for 15-20 minutes.

    As far as the tingle -- it is probably the blood trying to repair the tissue and nerves in your embouchure. As it passes with fresh blood and the nutrients from your body the tingle is the repair process starting.

    Our body repairs our embouchure EVERYTIME we play, no matter our level or experience. Playing uses muscles and just like working out in a gym on your body, after we use those muscles our body needs to repair those muscles that have been used.

    The tingle is different for every player, just as is the amount of swelling and time to recover. Don't worry about it unless it continues for long periods of time, and if that is the case the person you may need to speak with is a doctor, not a trumpet teacher.
     

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