Quick breath?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by loweredsixth, Mar 20, 2005.

  1. loweredsixth

    loweredsixth Pianissimo User

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    Mar 11, 2005
    Fresno, California, USA
    Mr. Laureano,

    I have a question regarding how quick we breath before playing. Obviously, there are times when performing that a quick breath is required. I am curious about those times when performing that you have a lot of time to take your breath (having come off a multiple measure rest, or starting a piece, etc.)

    Do you recommend that we still inhale quickly? Or should be take our time?

    I have noticed that while I am practicing, I always inhale slowly. That might be a problem.

    Thanks

    Joe Lewis
    jazz cornetist
     
  2. loweredsixth

    loweredsixth Pianissimo User

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    Mar 11, 2005
    Fresno, California, USA
    BTW, I just got Cal Price's new book on breathing, and I look forward to working through it!
     
  3. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Lowered,

    Imagine that you're standing in a swimming pool and you want to swim under water. Take the big breath the same way as you would for the pool scenario. You fill up quickly but not frantically as though you were drowning. When you're drowning you gasp and you're body is tight. When you just want to swim you take a full breath in about a second's time.

    ML
     
  4. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    Everybody,

    Lowered's question begs even further probing.

    He asked about how quickly an initial breath should be taken and I answered that but then I realized that many people don't know how to take the fast breaths within phrases such as the ones needed to play Petrushka and the Promenades from Pictures at an Exhibition.

    When I thought about the gasping analogy as ineffective I relized that is precisely that kind of gasping breath that so many trumpeters engage in when they have to snatch a quick breath to finish a phrase. Why is the gasping breath bad?

    The gasp is bad because of where the friction is created: the back of the mouth. Friction is created when you close off the throat. It creates a smaller opening and the fast breath combined with the smaller opening makes that "gasp" sound we know that accompanies fright, surprise, or panic.

    When the friction is at the lips instead, an efficient conduit for air is formed that lets us inhale more easily and in a relaxed yet quick way. Obviously, if you take that to it's Nth degree it's as inefficient as gasping. If you create a tiny opening, it takes forever to inhale and the point becomes lost.

    ML
     
  5. loweredsixth

    loweredsixth Pianissimo User

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    Mar 11, 2005
    Fresno, California, USA
    Thanks! I feel like I should pay you for a lesson you just gave me :-)
     
  6. Fusion2002

    Fusion2002 New Friend

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    Dec 11, 2004
    I think Manny Needs to change his Avitar to Superman.... I feel like I should pay him every time I read anything on this forum... Invaluable information....
     

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