Quiet time...what to study?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by crowmadic, Apr 6, 2009.

  1. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 3, 2006
    This may turn out to be stupid question but here goes. When you don't have the trumpet in your hands or to your lips, and want to advance your Jazz playing abilities, celebrally , what should you be studying? I know there's a whole variety of things you could study, but I'm asking about some essentials here. Do you look at scales and memorize them? Do you look at chords and analyze them? If a piano's at hand do you work on ear training, speed reading, etc.? I know all of these are important, but I'm looking for a couple of essentials here. And if there are learning tools such as flash cards, etc., I'd appreciate information about acquiring such tools. Who was it that said, "there are no stupid question?" I hope that proves to be true today.

    crow
     
  2. BergeronWannabe

    BergeronWannabe Piano User

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    Feb 6, 2007
    Fingering scales and arpeggios is always good, I do it all the time in the middle of class! :roll:
    I also have been working on a couple transcribed solos, getting those under my fingers.
    Transcribe one yourself, check out one I did here- click on Study in Brown
    cSharp Jazz

    Email Mike, take a couple lessons- he's got PLENTY of great stuff to do.
    Have fun,
    -Andrew
     
  3. Dupac

    Dupac Fortissimo User

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    Bordeaux, France.
    The question was not stupid, my answer may be, or at least out of subject, but here it comes : listen to good old records by jazz masters of the trumpet , that's what I often do...
     
  4. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    Ithaca NY
    I'm with Dupac - listening is crucial to the process of developing your jazz fluency.

    veery
     
  5. samdaman

    samdaman Pianissimo User

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    Jun 15, 2006
    Baltimore, MD
    Late last year, the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra performed at PSU. We were privileged enough to have a master class with Wynton. It was kind of last minute, so the graduate brass quintet got a coaching session with him, because they had an up coming performance at the National Quintet Competition in Kentucky. I forget the name of the piece they were playing, but the horn part was (felt in) in 4/4, second trumpet in 3/4, and 1st trumpet in 6/8 or some such organization (all the parts were in really DIFFERENT meters). He was able to tap 3/4 (with accents) in his left hand, 4/4 in his right, stomp 6/8 and sing the melody all at sight. My jaw hit the floor. He said he practices like 3 against 2, tapping out different two line rhythms and other things like that. I would highly recommend doing things like that!
     
  6. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

    688
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    Oct 3, 2006
    Thanks to all. At the age of 66 I've collected and listened to a lot of Jazz. Granted, I can do more analyzing than I usually do. I like the suggestions made to this point, and will incorporate them. I hope there are more suggestions along the lines of aids for memorization, etc.


    crow
     
  7. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
    Hi crowmatic,
    I finger out improvs to tunes that are either on the radio or my MP3.
     
  8. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

    688
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    Oct 3, 2006
    Markie,
    Can you ellaborat on what you said. Do you finger the improvs that your hear someone else do, or are you creating your own improvs? If your creating your own improvs are you doing it in the key of the song your listening to? If so you are truly one of the blessed with great ears!

    crow
     
  9. Markie

    Markie Forte User

    2,156
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    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
    Hi crow,
    I finger my own improv to the song and yes it's usually in the right key. As far as being blessed, thank you.
    Fortunately/Unfortunately my hearing is sensitive to intonation.
    If I'm doing a gig and have to be subjected to a musician who plays out of tune or waivers on intonation, I usually end up after the show feeling like I don't want to touch music anymore. Sometimes it gives me a low grade headache.
    I've also managed to irritate people when I've told them they're out of tune or they are "pitchy". The upside to my hearing is that unless I have a cold, my intonation is dead on.
     
  10. SalsaRob

    SalsaRob New Friend

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    Mar 6, 2009
    Studying scales & pieces are very good but I totally think that good practice is also studying without the horn. Just good `ol studying......there is this great book called[i hope this is the title]..."Modern reading text in 4/4", wow, what a great book. It`s not a book you play along with your horn, it`s a study book for your mind, keeps you mind sharp.
     

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