Quivering & its remedy

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by crowmadic, Jul 4, 2007.

  1. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 3, 2006
    Dave, I think we're establishing a nerve problem here. How can one experience "nervousness" when playing for one-self? Taking deep breaths sounds good but stopping it during the performance is what I'd like to do........crow
     
  2. Walter

    Walter Piano User

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    Sep 11, 2006
    Crow I know exactly what you are talking about as I have had the problem occasionally...I played for years without ever experiencing it....I first noticed it when I went from a ML Bach to a LB Bach .....it is not the instrument but I think the LB instrument seems to amplify to problem.....probably an air issue.....nervous shallow breathing into a horn that needs more air.

    Another factor at the time of the instrument change was moving up a gear in practice and playing more gigs (more tension).....my chops would become tight like stiff muscles after exercise.

    The quivering sound is like someone who has stage fright but like you say it can happen on your own...I am sure there is some phycological issue...you think " oh no there it is" at that point you probably imagine it happening in front of people and it gets worse..... you in effect create an audience in your mind.

    I still think it's starts with tension both mental and physical......someone said awhile ago that "tension is the enemy".....

    It would be really good to hear from someone who has worked through this issue...........?

    Walter
     
  3. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    I've worked through it twice. The first, many years ago, after an embouchure change--I was finally doing things right, and the quivering started. This was the result of some weak and neglected muscles that were finally getting worked: I wouldn't feel tired, but the quivering was always there, and I just played through it. It is the same as the "sewing machine leg" that rock-climbers experience.

    The second time, the quivering was caused by perpeptual hangovers. The visible tremors went away after a week, the invisible (but hearable) took more time.
     
  4. stchasking

    stchasking Forte User

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    Jun 11, 2006
    This subject was covered in the ITG journal. I'll try to find the issue. I have had this since grade school. My solo critiques in high school always mentioned this problem. I have had it while holding the high notes in Handels Messiah and I've gotten it playing taps. It seems to be an upper respiratory spasm from nervous tension. I think my beta blockers for High BP has helped the problem.

    I also have the lower jaw problem. That was a night mare. I think going back to an ML or M bore trumpet might help. My large bore hasn't done much for me so I think it is time to get back to standard horn geometry. Keeping my jaw forward helps.

    Jim
     
  5. Walter

    Walter Piano User

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    Sep 11, 2006
    Jim I hope you can find the issue ....especially if there are practical steps to reduce the quivering. ....it could help lots of players.....

    For me it seems to goes away on it's own and I can play for months with the steady vibrato less sound I strive for....I suppose it's important not to let the problem have too much value.
    Walter
     
  6. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 3, 2006
    Walter, Your wisdom is shining through. There is some perverted comfort in knowing that trumpet player way better than me experience the same thing. I will take all the bits of information gathered from all the responses to this issue and apply them hoping for improvement. I look forward to any articles about this subject.............thanks to all, crow
     
  7. stchasking

    stchasking Forte User

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    Jun 11, 2006
    Crow,

    I just spent the last 2 hours looking for the article. I can't find it. What I will suggest is to go to the International Trumpet Guild site and search the archives. The ITG has everything they ever published available On the web site. They also have past issues on CD. I'll keep looking but give it a try and let me know if you find something interesting.
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Crow,
    The deal with blood pressure is actually quite simple.
    Our bodies are built in a way that during times of stress, the heart starts pumping harder to supply the body cells with oxygen - by raising the blood pressure AND that throws just about everything else emotionally and physically off track. After a while, we don't even need stress to get our blood pressure up. I am sure that there are TMers that can describe exactly what happens, but to be honest, I do not need to know any more than "high blood pressure is not good". We have enough in life to worry about - like if our valve oil or mouthpiece is optimal, if our bells are annealed or leadpipes have been antistatically treated - no need for the scary details concerning health!

    I solved my problem a year and a half ago (APAP maschine, a new boss and a little pill (not a beta blocker) every day) - no more quivering!
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2007
  9. mcstock

    mcstock New Friend

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    Aug 15, 2005
    Norman OK
    Keith Johnson gave me some interesting advice on this years ago. His take was that we all have some instability in our sounds, after all we're flesh and blood, muscles twitch, etc. Instead of focusing on the quiver, focus on the core of the sound, making it bigger & richer. Eventually, the core "consumes" the instability in the sound and it goes away.

    FWIW,
    Matt
     

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