Range Developement

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Bad Luck Lux, Nov 13, 2011.

  1. DaTrump

    DaTrump Forte User

    1,963
    608
    Oct 21, 2011
    Huntsville, Texas
    Air, lots and lots of air. If you haven't popped a lung, you aren't using enough.
     
  2. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

    16,418
    7,544
    Dec 22, 2008
    Virginia
    No trick embouchure?! ;-)
     
  3. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

    8,612
    2,128
    Sep 20, 2009
    New York State USA
    yeah - switch mpc to an asymmetric -- and don't forget to practice more --- oh yeah -- practice long tones -- lots of them ---- breath properly also -- ROFL, ROFL
     
  4. Al Innella

    Al Innella Forte User

    1,189
    84
    Aug 9, 2007
    Levittown , NY
    The best tip I can give you is to find a teacher who can not only play in that range , but can also teach others how it's done.Some players can play high but have no idea how they're doing it.Playing the upper register is technique and coordination of embouchure,tongue, air and brain.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2011
  5. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

    2,513
    1,291
    May 7, 2011
    Arizona
    In my opinion:
    Any lead player needs a very solid G
    A good lead player has a solid A and can pop DHC's
    A great lead player has a solid DHC, and probably a D also. (think Bergeron, Ingram, Shoop, Englebright)

    There are guys that play well above DHC, but it's probably not written in the chart unless the arranger knew who was going to be playing the part.
    All the above includes the correct stylistic, phrasing and intonation capabilities that go with range to make a lead player.
     
  6. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

    8,612
    2,128
    Sep 20, 2009
    New York State USA
    and me thinks that it takes a coordinated effort with the embouchure, tongue, air, brain, and face muscles for a few 1000 hours before it really gels together -- well that is my opinion 2000 hrs +, and then you to can say to all of the TM'rs -- it isn't as hard as everyone makes it seem ---- because after you put in the time -- only then can you say that stuff,
     
  7. DaTrump

    DaTrump Forte User

    1,963
    608
    Oct 21, 2011
    Huntsville, Texas
    Don't give them an idea. There is a video somewhere of Adam Rapa giving a girl high note lessons, and he talks about vowels. If you can get the vowels right then high notes aren't that hard. Do not get an asymmetric most players cannot even use them. Just use the equipment you have, get good with that before you even consider drastic changes.
     
  8. gbdeamer

    gbdeamer Forte User

    1,869
    210
    Oct 16, 2008
    You're just wrong.

    There are many big band charts that have written lead parts with G's, A's, and B's above high C. Kenton tunes, Nestico charts, Gordon Goodwin, etc. all have lead books written well above high C.
     
  9. gbdeamer

    gbdeamer Forte User

    1,869
    210
    Oct 16, 2008
    I get that you're a kid and that you're trying to help people, but making blanket, definitive statements like this about equipment is silly.

    Just because you may or may not have had success with an asymmetric mouthpiece it doesn't mean that "most players" can or can not use them.

    Look up some of Nick Drozdoff's videos when he was playing asymmetric pieces. Sounds pretty good. I play next to a guy who uses on in a wind symphony and a guy who used one in a big band. Worked for them too.

    There are no "bad" mouthpieces. Some (like asymmetric, Parduba, Rudy muck, etc.) take more getting used to because of their unique designs, but they're just tools. It's how people approach using them and their expectations of miraculous results that need to be tempered.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2011
  10. DaTrump

    DaTrump Forte User

    1,963
    608
    Oct 21, 2011
    Huntsville, Texas
    Bill Chase used a tiny tiny tiny mouthpiece but you don't see hordes of other players using them. I'm not saying they don't work but they definitely are not for everyone, not something you just want to go out and get. But a blanket statement saying that many people cannot use them is accurate. I have seen vast amounts of players try them and a very minute amount like them and an even smaller few sound good on them. Recommending asymmetric is bad because of that. Now if i had said that about a common mp, say the Schilke 13A4a, then that would have been out of line because many are successful on that. However if he may try and like it, more power to him but as a recommendation purely to increase range? Not in his best interests.

    Not only that but he would have to change his entire embouchure to use it therefore if he wanted a different one for classical work, it could prove difficult. Especially going off to college, destroying your embouchure for a few extra notes is just plain asinine. If you want more high notes, practice more, ‘nough said. There is no need for such a drastic mouthpiece change.

    Now calling me a kid, that is a bit of a low blow. I may be young but that doesn't mean I don't know what I'm talking about. Don't quote me on this but wasn't Wynton Marsalis 7 or 8 when he had his first major performance? And if my memory serves right he was pretty well respected in the trumpet world. Being a kid, as compared to an older person, doesn’t strengthen or weaken what I said. Age is irrelevance in advice, and thusly should be treated as such.

    Back to the issue at hand though, just practice. If you don’t know what to do just do some practicing, plus going into a college band will augment your playing abilities. The range that you claim to have is impressive, and once you get the individual attention that is received in college, it will surely prove to be a force to reckoned with.
     

Share This Page