Range exercises for beginning students?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by The Weez, Jan 29, 2010.

  1. missmybaby

    missmybaby Pianissimo User

    114
    1
    Sep 27, 2009
    Detroit Metro
    rowuk,
    What do you tell the younger players? Are you actively teaching beginners now? I ask in all seriousness, not trying to be funny.
     
  2. ozboy

    ozboy Mezzo Forte User

    764
    74
    Jan 17, 2007
    Australia
    sometimes too much information can lead to unwanted problems. You want young plays to develop natural production. obviously there are some out there that need remediation etc. I have found that if you tell a young player too much technical info they can unnaturally adjust and create problems they never had. This explanation is, in itself, a simplification. A good teacher gives the correct amount of technical info to improve a player and appropriately increase their knowledge.
     
  3. Keith Fiala

    Keith Fiala Pianissimo User

    239
    1
    Feb 21, 2007
    Austin, Texas
    I agree with you Rowuk that kids themselves don't have the capacity, but since a lot of adult players haven't developed the aperture properly, it's important that they are conveying the proper message. Understanding and recognition is the first steps to becoming a better player as well as a teacher.

    Just my humble thoughts -

    Keith
     
  4. ska

    ska Pianissimo User

    69
    0
    Sep 12, 2009
    Estonia
    Well, training range...practice practice practice and practice some more.
    I'm a jackal with practicing to be honest, I practice every day every chance I get - sometimes it evens happens so I practice about 6 hours a day - and no, I don't hurt myself at all, don't worry (yes, I have no life - if there is a massive blizzard outside )

    For those kids tho, if they play 20 minutes in the band practice and don't take the horns even home along to practice , wow...I'm not really suprised they don't hit them high Fs and stuff. 20 minutes every day, and they should have improved alot. LEt them practice simple stuff, slurring from C to C or C to G (not high), practice some fingering with CDEF G FEDC, adding speed , changing to higher scales. and then ofcourse, long tones - I do long tones for warming and cooling - for about maybe 30 40 minutes, but for starters, a few minutes of decent long tones should definitely help.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2010
  5. Keith Fiala

    Keith Fiala Pianissimo User

    239
    1
    Feb 21, 2007
    Austin, Texas
    Here's one problem I have with telling students (young ones) to practice for a set amount of time. Most kids these days (not all, but most) focus on the TIME vs. what and how they're practicing. I did an experiment of sorts a few months back, and I took 20 of my students and told 10 of them to practice for 15 minutes on the fundamentals we've been working on (tonguing, reading, rhythm, intonation). The other 10, I gave them the same specific things to practice with GOALS for each day in mind (no set time). The kids who practiced for 15 minutes either made no progress or fell further behind, while the kids with specific goals and no set time excelled.

    My point is, if you tell a student that just by practicing for 20 minutes each day they will get better, is incorrect. They can "practice" for 8 hours a day and make no progress - because most will avoid fundamentals and focus ONLY on the time aspect vs. long range improvement.

    Many of the ones that had been told practice for 15 minutes used they excuse that they had to practice their band music - things they had been playing for weeks and could already play.

    Bottom line - goal set! Not time set!

    Keith
     
  6. ska

    ska Pianissimo User

    69
    0
    Sep 12, 2009
    Estonia
    Yeah, well setting a specific time limit is wrong, I know that, I was like more hinting on the matter they'd actually play. I myself have no timelimits :D I practice to my heart's content (which can be hard to meet )
     
  7. mike ansberry

    mike ansberry Forte User

    1,217
    322
    Dec 30, 2003
    Clarksville, Tennessee, U
    In my middle school bands, we play flexibilities into the upper range. While doing this I emphasize proper use of the air, focused sound, etc. Most of my kids have no trouble with Gs.
     
  8. ska

    ska Pianissimo User

    69
    0
    Sep 12, 2009
    Estonia
    PErhaps you should run a test to everybody..See how they all breathe. my teacher used to hold my lower back, the part that's suppose to swell when you breathe correctly, everytime I didn't he told me to stop playing, breathe out, and breathe in again correctly. That did the trick pretty fast :)
     
  9. Phil

    Phil Pianissimo User

    50
    0
    Jun 7, 2009
    Cookeville
    I think the chromatic long tones is a great idea as well as introducing them to using the mouthpiece as a practice tool. Have them buzz like a siren; you could easily write a short little piece or study for whole band that has the trumpets buzzing a siren to keep them entertained. I think subtle little exercises you can do with the whole class like the chromatic and major scales in long tones is the best idea to help increase range without knowing. Our director of athletic bands, who is a former middle and high school director said an easy subtle way to increase their range is to play long tone scales adding an extra note on top; i.e. C D E F G A B C D up and sustaining the D longer than the rest of the notes, and then go back down the scale.
     

Share This Page