Range question :(

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trumpetgirl612, Jan 1, 2006.

  1. Derek Reaban

    Derek Reaban Mezzo Piano User

    609
    1
    Jun 16, 2005
    Tempe, Arizona
    Jack,

    Manny, as always, is right on the money. I just finished reading an article about Arnold Jacobs and Vincent Cichowicz in the most recent ITG Journal related to your question that I wanted to excerpt (Page 30):




    Emily,

    I really like what Manny told you. At the ITG conference in Denver, James West echoed this idea about finding an optimal “spot†or “mark†where your sound will be the best. He said, "Most noise for the least effort is right on. Yes, the mouthpiece has a place where you get the most sound for the least effort!

    Once you find this place (just buzzing on the mouthpiece), be aware that once you insert the mouthpiece into the horn, you may hold your instrument in such a way that it changes the angle of this optimal spot just slightly.

    There’s a very interesting article by Sam Burtis (a Caruso Student) called Buzz Off!. I especially like the concept about finding a great buzz on the mouthpiece, and then taking note of the associated angle at which your are holding the mouthpiece when achieving this sound. Many times when the mouthpiece goes in the horn, the angle at which you are holding the horn MAY be different than this optimal angle you found while buzzing the mouthpiece alone. Getting the horn to be in alignment with that angle may help in the ease of sound production on the instrument.

    Another thing that I notice from your schedule / outline is that you do a lot of “skill set†exercises, but you don’t mention any “balance / centering†exercises. If you take Manny’s advice and start working from a position of “gorgeous soundâ€, it would serve you very well to divide your practice day so that you spend some time focusing on balance / center to cultivate this sound which will carry into your skill set work. Craig Morris talks about this in an article called Fundamentally Speaking which I mention in this link. It’s a very well conceived way to focus on the important aspects of your playing day (centering must have a prominent / dedicated session each day).

    Hope these thoughts give you a little more detail to consider!
     
  2. JackD

    JackD Mezzo Forte User

    736
    1
    Nov 30, 2003
    Manchester / London
    Interesting, guys. Thanks!

    I ask because it's something my teacher has suggested to me re: high register playing, and it's not something I've ever used before.
     
  3. trumpetgirl612

    trumpetgirl612 Pianissimo User

    249
    0
    Mar 30, 2005
    practice room 5
    thanks so much ffriends!!
    xoxo
    Em
     
  4. reversedlead

    reversedlead New Friend

    19
    0
    Jul 10, 2005
    Seattle
    I would like to offer my humble opinion as well.

    I think part of what the braces did was tell your lips "No pressure" because it hurt if you use too much. I think part of your trouble is that you use way more pressure now than when you had braces, but it feels the same, so you don't know it. I went through the same problem, and now I can play higher than I did with braces (this change was in sophmore year, now I'm a senior).

    So try a "less" pressure approach.

    Also, since you are having pitch troubles (by the sounds of it) it sounds like you are fighting the horn. Try leadpipe buzzing. Take off your tuning slide, and put your mouthpiece in. Try to get a loud reedy buzz out of it. The note should be somewhere in the F (concert Eb) range (it should slot right there). Getting a fat, reedy buzz out of the pipe helps get you "in phase" with the horn, basically, it helps you work with the horn to create sound, instead of against it. It will improve your response and tone, and your pitch problems should go away. (Also, using too much pressure will also make your pitch sharp, as it impinges the lips)

    I would also recommend staying away from consciously using vowel sounds. This could (probably, at your stage in the game) lead to overanalyzation, which can do some very bad things to your range. Focus on keeping yourself (tongue, throat) relaxed. If you focus on that and the sound, the vowels will occur naturally.

    Just MHO,
    Brandon
     
  5. trumpetgirl612

    trumpetgirl612 Pianissimo User

    249
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    Mar 30, 2005
    practice room 5
    thanks but im not acutally HAVING patich problems
    ill keep that in mind tho
     
  6. reversedlead

    reversedlead New Friend

    19
    0
    Jul 10, 2005
    Seattle

    Oops.. That must have been the guy above.

    Brandon
     
  7. trumpetgirl612

    trumpetgirl612 Pianissimo User

    249
    0
    Mar 30, 2005
    practice room 5
    heh its ok, sorry if that came off as rude
    thanks for your input tho
    i appreciate it
     

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