Range vs Tone

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Aarix, Feb 1, 2013.

  1. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Tom, I really like your comments about listening to performance recordings and overplaying, but when it comes to style there also exists the danger of being so subtle that nobody notices. That is why stage actors look so funny at close range in their make-up. It has to project across the stage, and as you said recordings can help if we listen to the group as a whole rather than just ourselves.
     
  2. Aarix

    Aarix New Friend

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    I appreciate everyones replies, I'm probably not explaining myself well here.

    I suppose, but it just feels like I'm fighting the part of me to play out, I always make sure to obey the dynamic, My volume is at expected level to any other band I've played in. But I do need to play with more calm emotion.


    I appreciate the advice. I will take it into consideration when I do more practice. I just feel like I'm fighting myself when I don't exert sound. Thought exert implies its rough, which isn't really the case.


    When I say they suck I mean they don't play out. What the composer says numerous time is "The lead trumpet is doing an amazing job with balance now its your turn to do the same, put some air through those horns. They never do and he eventually gave up until they have a melody that can't be heard well. Other composers always noticed me and for jazz band and pep band, they needed me they said for stuff like that. But its a double edged sword with concert styled band. But the problem is when I tick other people off, should I really care if the composer doesn't say anything?

    There HAS to be a point where someone underplays, when I was on tuba and I was apparently too loud, and was griped at by the trombone. I stopped playing and guess what. I heard the flutes, clarinets, saxophones but the trombones...nah. It festers under my skin how this trombone gripes at me constantly to "Balance" yet it goes double for her.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2013
  3. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    Entirely correct. I'd rather underplay than overplay, though.

    Tom
     
  4. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    ...but only to an extent. We only allow conductors to wave small sticks at our faces.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. tjcombo

    tjcombo Forte User

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    Oh yeah, in violent agreement here. Understatement along with the "gaps" make a big contribution to the artistry of a performance. Kind of like the difference in humour between a joke that gradually dawns on you and in-your-face slapstick.

    I sympathise with the OP playing in an ensemble where other sections may not be carrying their weight, but balancing your contribution to get the best overall sound is important whether you're with a bunch of under-performers or stars.

    Maybe you can find a rock band where you can have fun blowing flat-out - lots of fun and a counterpoise to the other ensemble?
     
  6. BinaryHulledIon

    BinaryHulledIon Piano User

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    It's good that you have range. IMHO, tone is just as important. They're both pieces, along with several other components, which comprise masterful playing.

    It also sounds like you're outgrowing your ensemble. Seeing that you're a senior, do you have any collegiate plans? Have you toured their music programs, or looked into what's available in your community? Have you looked into private instruction?
     
  7. Aarix

    Aarix New Friend

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    I don't have any plans to take this into college. I plan to go into the field of technology while hopefully finding a community band to join after I graduate.
     
  8. misty.sj

    misty.sj Forte User

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    Don't take four years off. Trust me. Find a rock or swing band to play with or do something. If you think you will take a four year break it will be a 10+ year break.
     
  9. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Aarix, things musical are real hard to describe, let alone diagnose over the internet. It sounds as if you have great enthusiasm for the instrument and may need a new setting to play in. College is perfect for that. Our college Marching Band had majors from all fields and was a great way to meet and get to know a whole bunch of pretty cool people.

    Misty is right--if you give up the trumpet while in post-secondary education, you will find all kinds of reasons not to pick it up afterwards and will, in a sense, prevent you from having some wonderful musical and personal experiences.
     
  10. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    I've been there ... where in high school the focus is on the "marching" "blow your brains" out attitude of some band directors and I admit that without amplification on the field often this is neccessary but so often it tends to be just BLAMM SLAMM of sound by force and not true music IMO.

    Too, I did continue playing for three years after high school, but really didn't like the venue of most gigs I was performing at and went into USAF and got married (the first time) and in doing so "lost" my trumpets. While I minored in instrumental music in college, it was on rental instruments. In my second marriage funds were so minimal that affording an instrument of my own was nil. So comes my third marriage and my disablement when I picked it up again beginning in 2006 with a pre-owned Conn Director cornet given me, and surprisingly to myself was able to remember much of what I had been taught and continue to learn / re-learn much of what I didn't know or forgot, so much so that I've acquired more preowned instruments, even gotten into a bit of buy and sell to fund more acquisitions of what I now have with one exception, my Schilke P5-4 picc that my late brother gave me just weeks before he died. I now don't aspire to play professionally, but I'm sure enjoying playing and tutoring minimally. Now, if only I could do without a YSB I'd be happier.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2013

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