Ravel Concerto in G

Discussion in 'Orchestra / Solo / Chamber Music' started by gms979, Nov 19, 2005.

  1. gms979

    gms979 New Friend

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    Greetings,

    Articulation question for people....

    If opting to double tongue the Ravel Concerto in G, what do you all prefer - double tonguing ALL eighth notes (even an isolated pair), or only double tonguing in the middle third or so of the excerpt with the long run of eighth notes? I found recently that if I only double tongue the long stream of eighth notes, the excerpt becomes much more managable (assuming I'm taking it at a tempo too fast for single tonguing).

    What do you all do?

    Thanks!
    Greg
     
  2. MrClean

    MrClean Piano User

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    Do what works, and practice it at a variety of tempos/articulations. I have double tongued all, single tongued all (usual) and mixed. In the "heat of battle" you'd be surprised at the choices you end up making. Just make sure the choices are "on tap".

    J
     
  3. Jimi Michiel

    Jimi Michiel Forte User

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    Greg,

    If you can, check out Rob Roy McGregor's "Audition and Performance Preparation for Trumpet." There are four volumes and the first one includes the Ravel Piano Concerto. McGregor gives you several small etudes/exercises that really isolate the difficulties in each excerpt, which is particularly helpful on something as gnarly as the Ravel Piano Concerto.

    Hope this helps,
    Jimi
     
  4. Alex Yates

    Alex Yates Forte User

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    Atlanta, GA
    All single tongue for me.....but I have practiced it double-tongued just in case..... ;-) The end - definitely double tongued.

    Everyone talks about the moving notes in the opening, but also remember, coming off of the tied "G" on time (don't have music in front of me, I think it is the third or fourth full measure), and not late, has a lot to do with how the rest of the excerpt will go. Many folks sit on that note too long or don't make an accurate break from it when continuing on and then spend a few measures playing "catch-up". Answer: make sure to subdivide in your mind on the tied note.

    I have to add, the second movement of the Ravel is one of the most beautiful and tender in all of piano concerto rep....simply beautiful. However, the most tender and heartwarming for me is the second movement of Beethoven's "The Emperor". Tears EVERY time.
     
  5. MrClean

    MrClean Piano User

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    Try the second mvt. of the Barber Violin Concerto...
     
  6. Alex Yates

    Alex Yates Forte User

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    Oh yeah, another goodie, I agree. I was just talking piano concertos since the thread was about the Ravel Piano Concerto. ;-) That is another thread waiting to happen....favorite second movements of trumpet concertos and then concertos in general.
     
  7. Jimi Michiel

    Jimi Michiel Forte User

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    Christopher Rouse-Flute Concerto anyone? I usually prefer the classical oldies, but the outside "song" movements of this one are just transcending...

    -Jimi
     
  8. HoosierDaddy

    HoosierDaddy Pianissimo User

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    Ugh all this mushy stuff, cut it out.
     
  9. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Mushy stuff aside, is there anyone else besides me who is jealous of the English horn solo in the 2nd movement of the Ravel? It would have been PERFECT on the trumpet. So, we'd have the slow movement of the Shost and the Ravel for our repertoire. But NO-O-O-O.

    ML
     
  10. Alex Yates

    Alex Yates Forte User

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