Raw Mouthpiece

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by alant, Sep 14, 2013.

  1. alant

    alant Pianissimo User

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    Anyone know of any issues with a raw mouthpiece, any advantages?
     
  2. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    They do not taste good.
    In my early days I had a Selmer that was back to raw brass in the cup after years of use and dedicated cleaning, and I used Brasso to polish it when it got back to raw brass, and then clean it and rinse it, and used a boot cloth to wipe it. It would last about 3 months between cleans.

    I was too poor to consider re-plating back then, Silver plate is way preferable IMO, Just cannot stand raw brass mpce at all, but like raw brass horns.
     
  3. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    BTW I forgot to add that after brasso cleaning as above, I did not notice any issues. As it got dull, it got grippy and smelly. I did not like the unpolished raw brass mpce, but polished was OK.
     
  4. stumac

    stumac Fortissimo User

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    Raw brass can cause alergic reactions, even lead to brass poisoning with enough exposure, even silver plating can cause reactions in some people.

    My favorite MP is raw, Surgical Stainless Steel.

    Regards, Stuart.
     
  5. Comeback

    Comeback Forte User

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    Stuart,
    I have always had minor concerns about stainless mouthpieces. Do you think there is much chance for reaction or harm proceeding from exposure to chromium used to create the stainless alloy? Individual sensitivities would, of course, have to be considered.
    Jim
     
  6. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    None at all. High chrome alloys are standard for 'hygienic' fittings in food processing (as well as cutlery) precisely because they are safe.
     
  7. Comeback

    Comeback Forte User

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    Thank you, Seth. I spent 10 years associated with the foundry industry. CrVI was a big concern, but that exposure had to do with processing operations such as grinding and welding.
    Jim
     
  8. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Hexavalent chromium is an entirely different animal, Jim. You have to do some pretty extravagant chemistry to get that stuff from the metallic form.
     
  9. Comeback

    Comeback Forte User

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    Yes, you are correct - chemistry or processing. Stainless steel foundries can have elevated levels in atmospheres that "knock on the door" of Permissible Exposure Limits (PELs) established by U.S. OSHA. The darn stuff can be hard to control!
    Jim
     
  10. 9horn

    9horn Pianissimo User

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    Feb 25, 2009
    New York
    I had a Martin mouthpirce in raw brass that I got a fat brassy sound with, had it silver plated at Kanstul, now plays a bit more toned down and I have to push it to get that same sound.
     

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