reading rest

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by alant, Nov 1, 2013.

  1. alant

    alant Pianissimo User

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    Can anyone recommend a good book or some good sheet music for getting into rest. on the beat off the beat, crotchet, quaver minim etc.
     
  2. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    What exactly do you need?
     
  3. alant

    alant Pianissimo User

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    Rochdale UK
    i need to read through different rests in a piece with confidence so that when i emerge 5 bars later (or more or less ) that i am still in time with the piece.
     
  4. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    Well... if you are looking for literature to help you develop your rhythm reading skills then I suggest spending time with something like the Arban book and, if required, a metronome. Also a quick google search produced these links:

    Rhythm Reading Exercises

    Vic Firth Presents: Norm Weinburg's WebRhythms

    If you are looking for even more fundamental information about notation then there are surely beginners books in your local bookshop or music shop, or library. Wikipedia has this page:
    List of musical symbols - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Perhaps if your question were a little clearer you might get a better answer than this one.

    --bumblebee
     
  5. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    get the beat, say you are in 4/4 count 1234 2234 3234 4234 5234 etc simples
     
  6. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    I must admit when counting long sequences of rests I cheat a little. There is usually somebody else playing when I'm not and I learn to listen out for cues to match to my own musical part. Mark this reminder on your score with a pencil if you need to. If you are coming in at an important point after a difficult-to-count rest you could ask the conductor (if there is one) for a special cue.

    --bumblebee
     
  7. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    The symbology of the notes and rests will not of themselves allow you to determine the timing. This is done mostly by tempo vis anything from Largo thru Allegro and even these modified. Too, not all composers/arrangers indicate even these. In my experience, not even all conductors will either. Yes, in home practice we've no idea. At best, I like to be specific and set my timing by a definite number, but you'll not see my pencil marking of such. Really, it is mostly a matter of learning to blend with others as you play and much easier when you have a full score to see what the others are playing. Rule: It is NOT "in time with the piece" ... it is in time with others.
     
  8. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    Hi Ed,

    I would presume that the OP had some sort of idea of tempo aspects if he can play the notes when not resting?

    What you wrote reminds me of the mother of a member of the Cambridge rowing team who consoled her son after Oxford had won the race by saying how much faster than his team he had been rowing.

    --bumblebee
     
  9. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    It isn't cheating at all. I've played in some pieces with 100's of bars of rest (Mahler), and my pencil was my best friend. Other pieces, like Bach's Christmas Oratorio I've played so often that I don't need to count at all during the pieces. What can get difficult is something like Handel's Jeptha, which uses trumpets twice in 50 some-odd movements. I got a score and copied the beginnings of the movements just before the ones I played. Good pay for not much play, but boring as all get out.

    As for playing complicated rhythms, playing Funk in the 70's helped a bunch, and learned odd meters from playing Don Ellis charts.

    Bumblebee's links are awesome, by the way, and the Vic Firth exercises are downright wicked.
     
  10. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    Already saved the links - Thanks
     

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