Reasonable Expectations?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by john7401, Jul 12, 2010.

  1. john7401

    john7401 Pianissimo User

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    Ok thanks for all the posts
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I am not a big one for "sneaking" into anything. To me it is a waste of time increasing by 5 minutes a week. There is no reason why you can't do 3 or 4x 15 min per day, even with let's say, less advanced chops. That could be increased to 4 or 5 x 20 minutes without too much pain after a week or two and 4 - 6x 30 minutes later. If you have the time, 4 weeks is all you need to get enough chops to "play" 4 hours a day. As was mentioned above, accomplishing something in that time is the key, not the face time.

    My point, practice sessions should be goal driven, and real goals are tough with under an hour a day. A basic maintenance routine is at least 30 minutes, then 20-30 minutes of tunes to get some repertory, and then at the end comes the stuff to increase your technique and range. On band days, you are getting enough tunes there, then you can do the rest as it fits. A couple of examples: I can spend an hour alone on articulation/tonguing, the same goes for slurs, scales or technical studies. When I am playing, there is no sense of minutes. I am IN the music.

    I think it is a problem to even put minutes on concepts as getting better is not based on minutes, it is based on "getting it" and understanding and then transferring what is in your head to your body is not quantifiable in time units, you have to keep banging away until you "get it". Even with a 45 minute lesson per week, the actual getting better happens when the concepts demonstrated in those lessons are committed to HABIT during the HOURS spent during the week.

    The whole idea of adding 5 minutes a week shows that the results are not at the center of your thinking, rather an unrelated process. That is probably a great sign for a future bookkeeper.
     
  3. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    trickg sez:
    I think that anything between 30 minutes to 2 hours would be considered reasonable for anyone, and I think that virtually anyone serious about playing trumpet could work up to that.
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    There's a the fly in the ointment. Not everybody is serious about playing the trumpet (eventhough many say they are).
    Wynton suggests the following:
    "Three hours will allow you to cover all aspects of playing, but 45-60 minutes is enough for one sitting. The quality of the practice is more important than the length of time it takes."
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    I would say if a person has the goal of lengthing their practice, they should look first at what they are practicing. Quality v. Quantity.
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  4. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Totally agree Markie, to the point where I have developed a couple of pretty streamlined routines - probably around 75-90 minutes, but only about 30-40 if I'm pressed for time, but at this point I'm not really interested in improving - only maintaining and not losing anything.
     
  5. john7401

    john7401 Pianissimo User

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    Which is better in this case, being overly cautious or going at it full bored and wasting myself? I was able to focuss on more breathing, fingering, and rythm things during this time outside of just playing. I'm certainly looking for the best results in making and performing music. I do know though, that once you get smart practice down, then the more you can do that the faster you will improve.
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Why do you limit your choices to dumb or dumb? What is overly cautious? I would label that "non dedicated". Why is full bore "wasting"? Either you want to learn to play trumpet or you want to fool around. As I outlined above, there is more than enough stuff to do. You mentioned 4 hours and 20 minutes, I said it makes no sense to wait a year.

    If the brain is turned on while playing, then you can accomplish a lot. If it isn't, 5 minutes per week will not change that. It is like eating. You need all the stuff from the basic food groups. You don't start with malnourishment and "work" your way up to a standard diet. The advantage of the trumpet is that you can pig out daily and not get FAT!
     
  7. ltg_trumpet

    ltg_trumpet Mezzo Piano User

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    yeah, 30 minute sessions works really well. mhmm.
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2010
  8. john7401

    john7401 Pianissimo User

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    Because multiple people suggested that my issues could have been a result of overpracticing. I had it in my head that I didn't know my own limits and I was just getting back from a week and 1/2 of no playing. What you called dumb was what I thought was being safe. Before I left I was still doing well over an hour a day if not multiple hours. I don't want to start an argument or anything but this is just what I was thinking going into this.

    Yeah, I messed up. I'm grateful that I can find people here that can help me get back on track.
     
  9. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I doubt if your issues were the result of over-practicing. The chops are amazingly resilient, especially when a person is younger and recovers more quickly, and the human body is designed to adapt. A friend of mine who is a physical therapist says that workout routines need to be shaken up every two weeks because of the body's ability to adapt - otherwise we start to get stale and fall into a rut where we aren't maximizing our potential. Why would playing trumpet be any different.

    Now, it is possible that you are using too much pressure or not giving youself enough rest time in between exercises or something along those lines, but 20 minutes seriously is not even a good warm up for some people, and it's definitely not over-practicing at that point. My 2 cents and opinion of course, but based on the fact that I used to flat out abuse my chops in high school - especially as a Freshman when I approached playing in pep band like an attack dog - as hard and loud as possible. I played hard every day for MUCH more than 20 minutes and still continued to improve.
     
  10. Dark Knight

    Dark Knight Pianissimo User

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    Hi. I started out cautious. But, also my lips defined what I could do. I started off at 5 minutes and very gradually worked-up to about 45 minutes within about 3 to 4 months. Sometimes things would be going great then I would be able to do an hour or so after about 6 or 7 months. At that time, I joined this website and read here that two or more shorter sessions with rest in between would be better. I am now doing two half hour sessions, with a half hour between them. I am working up to a third half-hour session. That third session is mostly determined by how I can manage my work and family responsiilities.

    David
     

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