Rebuilding a Getzen Capri Cornet

Discussion in 'Trumpet Repair and Modification' started by Brekelefuw, Mar 2, 2010.

  1. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

    3,185
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    Mar 21, 2006
    Toronto
    Last week I went to an auction in Depew, New York. An instrument repair shop owner died and they auctioned off everything in his shop.

    I picked myself up a beat up Getzen Capri Cornet in silver plate. It cost me $100US

    This weekend I rebuilt it. Here are photos:

    [​IMG] Here is the side view. Notice the bell to body braces are smashed in, as well as the rear S brace. Also the leadpipe is bent downwards and has many dents in it.

    [​IMG] Here is a player's eye view. The bell flare is damaged, as well as the crook.

    [​IMG] THe amado waterkey on the leadpipe has been smashed in, and the brace connecting the 3rd valve slide to the ladepipe is also very smashed.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    The valve slides are also a bit dented.

    The first thing I did was pull the bell off.
    [​IMG]
    Some of the braces were popped before I got the horn.

    [​IMG]
    You can better see in this photo how the braces have damaged the bell.

    Using a variety of tools, I straightened the bell, which had been bent badly. I also removed the crook dents and bell flare dents and bell throat dents. Unfortunately, I got caught up in repairing the horn and didn't take pictures of the process.

    More to come, since there is a 10 picture limit in posts.
     
  2. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    Mar 21, 2006
    Toronto
    OK, next I did the slides. The dents were sharp dents, which are nasty to take out, but I got them out with a bit of effort. Sharp dents leave marks in the metal that are not worth the effort to take out, so the slides show signs of work.

    After the slides were done, I moved on to the leadpipe.
    When you work on curved tubing, the angle of the curve tends to open up. Because the leadpipe was so badly damaged, I left it on the horn while I did the rough dent work.

    [​IMG]
    I popped the amado key off so I could get my hammer (made of plastic) at the dent after the dent balls had raised it up to the approximate shape.

    [​IMG]
    I then removed the leadpipe from the horn entirely.

    [​IMG]
    Slowly, I worked the dentballs up to the size of the tubing and smoothed out the waterkey area damage, the brace area damage, as well as the bend and dents in the upper leadpipe.

    Finally, after the leadpipe was pretty close to shape using the dentballs and hammers, I brought out my secret weapons. The dent rollers. The rollers got the leadpipe back in to round and evened any uneven areas.

    [​IMG]
    The rollers on the left are trombone slide pliers, and the roller on the right is a tool I had custom made for me back when I was in college by Curtis Ferree.
    I use the trombone pliers on trombone slides, trombone main tuning slide crooks, trumpet bell crooks, and just about any other out of round tubing that they fit. If you are careful, you can really do good work with them. That being said, it is incredibly easy to squeeze just a bit too hard and have the tubing become flat, or very badly damaged. I wouldn't recommend buying a set of your own if you are a hobbyist.

    [​IMG]
    De-dented leadpipe.

    Next I resoldered the Amado key. To do this, I removed the 'guts' of the key and used a soldering clamp and a rivet to line up and hold the key in place. When you solder, sometimes the heat causes things to shift. Doing small things like waterkeys are hard to solder without clips.
    [​IMG]

    And finally, it is soldered back in place!
    [​IMG]

    Next post is going to be the finishing touches..
     
  3. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    Mar 21, 2006
    Toronto
    After the leadpipe was smoothed, I made sure that it was parallel with itself. Then I aligned the main tuning slide. It is important that all the pieces on the horn are aligned individually, and then again when they are installed. If slide tubes aren't aligned, they don't slide.

    I then installed the leadpipe on the horn. All of the soldering I did on the horn was done with low temperature silver solder. I chose to use this, because on silver plate horns, lead-based solder (soft solder) stains the plating as the lead leeches out of it. Low temp solder doesn't stain, is stronger, and the colour much more closely matches the silver of the plating.

    [​IMG]
    Leadpipe after it has been aligned and soldered on.

    Finally, I align the bell stem and solder the bell to body braces on. I don't use any clamps to hold the bell or leadpipe on while I solder them because I don't want to create any stress in the horn.

    After the bell to body braces and the bell stem to 1st valve is soldered, I refit the rear S brace to the horn. Because the bell and brace were damaged, I had to re-align the brace so it fit the new alignment of the horn. You don't want any stress on that brace either. I clamp one side of the brace using the clamp you saw on the previous post, and leave the other side free for me to solder. Then I remove the clamp and solder that side.

    After a little cleanup with a silver polishing rag we have the final product.
    [​IMG]
    Ta-da!

    [​IMG]

    The horn looks nice and sounds great! It is my 4th cornet. Now I can join a silver band.
     
  4. Dave Mickley

    Dave Mickley Forte User

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    nice work - you've got a keeper.
     
  5. oldlou

    oldlou Forte User

    Age:
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    Grand Rapids, Mi.
    Bravo, son. That is the sort of thing that old A.J.'Bill' Johnson taught me to do after he sold York Band Instrument Co. and opened his retail store.


    OLDLOU>>
     

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