Recording Quality

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trumpetrunner11, May 22, 2011.

  1. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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    I got mine just to noodle at home with and play along with Band In A Box changes. Also just to record audio snippets of horns I am selling. I picked up my SM57 & USB in a trade with a dealer that wanted his info engraved on rental units.
     
  2. duanemassey

    duanemassey Piano User

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    SM57 is not a terrible mic, but you will almost never see one used in a studio for a brass instrument. I would suspect that there is a preamp and/or mixer involved here, but it could be as simple as setting the levels properly on the input. Digital distortion is extremely non-musical, and cannot be "fixed".
     
  3. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    I agree that the SM57 isn't a great mic for recording trumpet. It's relatively inexpensive and will give you results that are relatively lousy compared to better microphones. I'm not sure why this particular mic comes up in these threads of recording. Bear in mind that this mic isn't used much (or at all) in most recording studios. Shure condenser mics and others will give better results than this, but cost a lot more. It's not difficult for a studio to spend $1500 on a single microphone ..... How do you think the SM57 will compare with that one??? You can only "doctor" a recording so much with software.

    Turtle
     
  4. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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    They are marketed as "Instrument Microphones" & the SM58 as a "Voice Mic"...

    Not so well, from an audiophile perspective... but you will still have a nice fat wallet to salve the emotional wounds caused by the embarassment about the bad recordings you will make. Besides... if the OP posts on youtube (like the 5-part harmony kid) then people are only going to be listening to them through their $2 5-watt PC speakers right?
     
  5. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    How many recording studios have you been in - the SM57 is used all the time and studios usually have a handful of them on hand, although it's used a lot for things like snare drums, guitar cabinets, and even vocals. Madonna did a lot of her vocals on her early work in the 80s with an SM57. It is sometimes referred to as the Swiss Army Knife of mics because it's range of application is pretty big.

    I think that the general consensus is that if you really want good brass recordings, then ribbon mics are the way to go, and the Royer ribbon mics seem to be heralded for use with trumpets.

    But, for basic stuff, an SM57 isn't bad - I guess it depends on what you want to get out of it. Condenser mics tend to give a real bright brittle edge to your sound.

    I multi-tracked this with an SM57 for both trumpets and drums - it's 4 trumpet parts (often in unison) snare and bass drum. I don't think it sounds terrible - do you?

    YouTube - ‪Frog Legs With Drums‬‏
     
  6. duanemassey

    duanemassey Piano User

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    I have yet to have an SM57 put in front of me in a recording session, period. They are used for vocalists (rarely, but in specific situations), but most commonly for guitar amps and toms. There are some cost-effective mics that would be a better choice for the home recordist (EV N/D468 would be my choice), and of course there are some hi$$ mics as well.
    Unless you have the other parts of the equation (decent preamp/interface) and you set the levels correctly it is a moot point.
     
  7. leftmid7

    leftmid7 Mezzo Piano User

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    the 57 is a uni directional mic and is standard for micing things like drums and guitar amps. with plug-ins you can get some decent sounds.

    ideally for wind instruments, you need to be able to hear the overtones and warmth of the room, too, the 57 will just get what's coming out the end of the bell.

    I did a session recently and the engineer used a multi directional mic I played straight at from about 3 feet away, and also had a room mic up above that similar to what you would use for a choir. they are still finishing up that record but I will try to post when it's complete.

    should be quite interesting, I laid about 6 trumpets, 2 flugel and 2 baritone, came out like some you'd hear in a Beatles record mixed with a mariachi band.
     
  8. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Okay, that is impressive! A good musician helps too ..... :thumbsup:

    I agree, the SM57 is good and if you only have that much $, you can't do any better. But there is help with the high pressure levels, patterns that don't make you play right on top of the mic, and switchable bass settings to help with not distorting.

    For example, AKG has one called the Perception 420 that has a warm condenser sound, 3 switchable patterns, switchable bass rolloff, and can handle sound pressure levels up to 145dB! I'm not sure about that dB number, but horns are what they're talking about with high sound pressure levels. It's around $300.

    While I haven't seen a lot of those SM57s, I have seen here locally, mics that cost $1800 each (my voice coach has a recording studio) and the Sweetwater catalog has a few that are roughly $5000. So, there is some difference in mics. I've heard that too about the ribbon mics being good for brass, but that's even more money. The Royers are expensive. There's a Samson VR88 ribbon mic that might be a great choice, for around $450.:dontknow:

    Turtle
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2011
  9. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    The Beatles and a Mariachi band sounds like a match made in heaven. Let us know when it'd done.:play:

    Turtle
     
  10. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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