Recording Quality

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trumpetrunner11, May 22, 2011.

  1. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    So does that mean that the mics on the US Presidential lectern don't count? (Dual SM57s - look it up.) I realize that this is a live setting, but it's also recorded, making them possibly some of the most famous recordings in history - every President since Lyndon Johnson has delivered speeches through SM57s.

    As for the SM57 being uni-directional, it is in fact cardioid, - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cardioid - so actually, it's mostly directional with decent side rejection and good rear rejection, and there is a fair amount of coloring if you try to use it off axis - that's what I've experienced using mine anyway.

    Keep in mind, I'm not really trying to defend this mic - especially not as a mic for recording trumpet, but I do think it's fair to talk about this mic for what it actually is, and to clear up some misconceptions that seem to be present in this thread regarding it. It gets the job done, but I have found that for me in order to get it to sound decent, I wind up having to use a mixture of distance from the mic, gain, (quite a bit) a bit of EQ, compression and reverb to get the kind of sound I'm looking for. If I'm right up on the mic, there is a lot of fuzz in the sound, but if I'm too far away it loses fullness. It's also not the best for reproducing the roundness of sound, hence the reason for the reverb.

    Again, it gets it done, but at some point I want to give a try to some of the budget level ribbon mics - supposedly with technology being what it is these days, (and the fact that ribbon mics are fairly old technology, developed in the 1920s) supposedly some fairly good offerings can be had in the $100-$200 range. (I read a review on a $20 home made ribbon mic that was apparently quite good)
     
  2. leftmid7

    leftmid7 Mezzo Piano User

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    yeah trick, I agree, I have used it and a 58 a lot in home studio. I'm just talking ideally for brass I think you'd want to go with what I outlined earlier.

    and thanks for the info, I thought it was strictly directional, didn't know it actually picked some up from the sides.
     
  3. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Ah - my mistake - when I first read that I thought you meant "omni-directional" - you are right though - the 57 is pretty much a directional mic, even though it does have a standard cardiod pattern. It picks up some side noise, but it's "colored" - at least in my experimenting with it, it loses some of the frequencies if I play off axis too far.

    I keep saying I'm about to take delivery on an SM7B - (waiting on the Shure rep to deliver it) I want to see how that does on trumpet.
     
  4. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    I can only imagine the High Pressure Levels (hot air) coming out of those guys ...... enough to match any trumpet probably.:-?

    Turtle
     
  5. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    BAAAHAHAHAHA! Touche! :lol:
     
  6. craigph

    craigph Piano User

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    While you're talking about mics - what is the difference in the SM57 and SM58? I've seen both of them in live (rock band) settings, but never knew what applications they were made for.
     
  7. duanemassey

    duanemassey Piano User

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    Both are industry standards. 58 is most typically used for vocalists, and it has an integral "pop" filter for that reason. 57's are used more for all-purpose applications, including vocals, but they can be a problem with vocalists who work the mic really close, as the "buh" noise can be detrimental. Back in the 60;s/70's we used 545's and 565's, which morphed into the 57's and 58's.

    Trick, last time I checked, no president played trumpet at any public function.:D I did mention that they were used for vocalists, but they are not commonly used in the studio for most vocal recordings, although there are some exceptions.
     
  8. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    @Patrick ...show off ...
     
  9. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    The difference between the 57 and the 58 really comes down to the windscreen - the capsules are identical. But, the differences in the windscreen account for the differences in the performance of the mics.

    Regarding studio use of the SM57 and 58, 57s are used all the time for instruments - again, mostly guitar cabinets, snare drums, etc. As for the 58, Bono from U2 recorded a lot of his vocals through either an SM58 (cardioid) or a Beta 58 (supercardioid) and he did it in the control room with the monitors blaring. Sometimes he was recording scratch vocals, but they wound up being so good they used them on the album. To be fair, a 58 will sound fantastic when it's being run through a good signal chain with high quality preamps, reverb and compression.

    A cheap alternative to an SM58 is the Behringer XM8500. Just over $20 and sounds very much like an SM58 - I own 3 of them that I picked up in a package deal for $60. I figured that even if they were terrible, I hadn't lost that much and I could find some use for them. I've messed with them recording vocals and they actually aren't half bad - equal to my SM57 for vocals IMO. Check out the reviews - a lot of people picked them up as backup mics and actually PREFER them to the SM58s they were using.
     
  10. craigph

    craigph Piano User

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    Thanks for all the microphone information Patrick. You have taught me a lot.

    I own one of those Behringers (SM57 clone I believe) and feel a bit guilty for that and other Behringer stuff I own since I've heard they only clone other's products and don't actually do any R& D themselves.
     

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