Recording software?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by eisprl, Dec 19, 2008.

  1. eisprl

    eisprl Mezzo Piano User

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    Does anyone know of any good and free recording software that I could record myself with along with a cd?
     
  2. Bach219

    Bach219 Mezzo Piano User

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    OH
    Have you tried Audacity? Though I'm not positive that you can record with a CD.
     
  3. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    I use Audacity. A little awkward to figure out at first, but overall a nice product ... and it's free.

    You can download it at Audacity: Free Audio Editor and Recorder (audacity.sourceforge.net).

    Yes, you can record yourself along with a CD or an MP3 file. You first copy the CD track into Audacity as a separate track. You then record yourself on a second track. Afterwards, you can edit your solo, add effects, record additional tracks, etc. It works great.

    Mike
     
  4. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    ... while we're talking about free music software ...

    I also use Impro-Visor. It's a free "band-in-a-box" program. It's definitely awkward to use at first, but you get used to it. I've never used PG Music's Band-in-a-Box, so I don't know how it compares.

    Impro-Visor works as a play-along device, providing a rhythm section accompaniment. It comes with more than 2,000 pre-programed songs. You can create additional songs. You can also use the software to create computer-generated solos. I sometimes use Audacity to record myself playing over Impro-Visor.

    You can download in at http://www.cs.hmc.edu/~keller/jazz/improvisor/.

    Mike
     
  5. eisprl

    eisprl Mezzo Piano User

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    Audicy is awesome! Just what I needed. The only problem I'm having is that my mic volume (even when I lower it) seems too loud. I get major distortion when I try to play back. I went into my computer settings and the program settings and lowered the mic volume to almost 0 and it's still distorted.

    Any ideas?
     
  6. eisprl

    eisprl Mezzo Piano User

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    oh ya, and how would I add a little reverb to an audio track? (It doesn't seem to be in the effects menu)
     
  7. Bach219

    Bach219 Mezzo Piano User

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    OH
    Maybe you mic is the problem?

    Try using Gverb on Audacity. It's located in the 'Effect' column, all the way on the bottom part. Though I'm pretty sure it's not the sound your looking for.

    Also, for the distortion, on Audacity their's a mic icon on the very top towards the right side of the screen. Bring that volume of the mic down a little.

    If that doesn't work, maybe your mic is fine, you just need to turn down the volume of the playback. So use the speaker icon and bring that down.
     
  8. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    Yes, GVERB is the default reverb effect with Audacity. If you want more effects (other than the 20 or so default ones), you can download them at Audacity: Plug-Ins. Let me warn you that with most of these effects, you need to play with the settings to get the sound you want.

    I agree with Bach219. Play with your mic levels. I don't have a problem with the cheap-o mic on my desktop computer. But I did have a distortion problem with the built-in mic on my laptop. I got rid of the distortion by adjusting the mic's noise-cancellation settings. See if you have something similar in the Control Panel.

    Mike
     
  9. swe1957

    swe1957 New Friend

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    Oct 4, 2008
    Woodford, QLD,Australia
    I just bought a Zoom H2. It records in stereo CD quality or Mp 3 files. it's great for recording anything. It records to SD memory cards, so the files are esy to transfer to computer. great for recording rehearsals and gigs.
    end of commercial.
    steve
     
  10. lovevixen555

    lovevixen555 Banned

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    I used to add sponge to mic when I could not get the input level low enough to keep distortion down. I would take kitchen sponges and one time my wifes collection of not yet used natural sponges and I just zip tied them together like a nice little hat for the mic. I used to us a nice crystal cartridge mic from the 1960's but I can not get new cartridge elements for it any more. I like crystal elements and vaccum tube amp's. I have not recorded in so long that this has not been an issue for me.

    You can also try not playing so close to mike! If you are trying to get around bad accostics by staying close tot he mic that does not work very well. You can play softer as well. If it is your room or a walk in closet or the basment you can use egg carton's or drink cadies attached tot he wall's. When I was a kid I used carpet samples fthat I got free at the end of the year as the new stuff was comeing out from carpet store's. I did about 2/3 of the walls in a walk in closet I had in my room and used to use that for a few year's until we moved. The carpet onthe walls helped so much. This also meant I did not have to eat the mic or play as loud. Also a lot of high end mikes can be trimed. You have to open up the access panel and some you neeed to take them apart and their will be a trim pot onthe circuit board. It basicly controls the built in op amp. If you mark the origanal location you can turn it down so that it sens a weaker signal out to your board/panel or in this case laptop and this can be undone latter.


    (Slightly off topic but good info for a young person to know about)
    I have one McIntosh 1000 watt tube amp that is awesome. I also have one that an old romate from college designed and we built together that is 5 channel and about 150 watt's RMS per channel. I used to use it with my Dolby digital decoder for surround sound before I lost my house. I can not run cables in a permanet manner where I curently live so it is boxed up and in my Mom and Dad's attic. If you have the chance and really like your sound invest in some nice tube amp's they are much warmer then the heavily biased japanesse transitor amp's most people use. Try to find models that use ceramic tubes or tubes built to mil spec. as these are much more durable. SOme people do not like added color to the sound that most tube amp's ahve but it is not so much added warmth as it is lack of harshness that you see with over biased trransistor's.
     

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