Recording Trumpet

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Dragon98987, Oct 7, 2010.

  1. Dragon98987

    Dragon98987 Pianissimo User

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    Ok thanks for the info. If I'm trying to do something like what Ed did with the multiple parts all put together what would be better suited for the job? The zoom or the preamp-mic setup?
     
  2. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    I borrowed my dad's Olympus LS-10 to record a jazz band on the beach in Mexico with great results. That Zoom H2 looks like a really useful one, with more mics and switchable patterns. The high quality really needs to be heard to be appreciated ... especially with that Zoom unit. Amazing microphones and the abilty to add even better mics if necessary.

    Turtle
     
  3. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    The Zoom H4n looks even better. And at Amazon for $299, that seems like a great deal.

    Turtle
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    When "recording" the trumpet, the question for me is what are we going to do with the tracks. If we want ro record several tracks and then mix them later, the type of music has a lot to say if close miking will sound natural.

    For recording pop music up close, a Shure SM57 or 58 are cheap and decent. If you want to use a condenser mic, I think the best sound is with the large diaphragm models (1"). I do not blow directly into the mike, rather 5-10" to the side of the mike.

    For a more natural "classical" sound, I prefer small diaphragm microphones. I use 2 Neumann KM84s with an ORTF spacing and angling for this type of recording, not cheap but REAL sounding. This type of miking only works in a good sounding room.

    if you are only controlling your progress or creating audio documents to preserve your experiences, the H2 or H4 are excellent units. There are also units by TASCAM/TEAC, Sony and Olympus that are more expensive and give better results.
     
  5. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Good post Rowuk! Thanks for that specific information.

    You make a good point about the Zoom units ..... I get excited about the quality of these very portable and easy to use recorders but they can't compare with high end studio mics. My singing coach has a great recording studio in his house and showed me a pair of mics he just received ($1800 each!) and we tried them out. Absolutely astonishing, you couldn't tell any difference.

    The zoom units (and scores of others like them from Olympus, Roland, etc.) are great for referencing what you sound like way out in front of the horn, capturing live performances, etc. If you want to cut an album you probably need something better.

    Turtle
     
  6. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Did you get all of that from the Wikipedia article about it?

    You know, I'm just not terribly worried about it. I'm not making money off of it - it was recorded for the sole purpose of doing the project for fun, and for sharing it with my family around last Thanksgiving. If I get any grief about copyright infringement (and given that the backing track was created by a friend of mine so there shouldn't be anything there) then I'll take it down. Considering that it has been up there for about a year without a peep, (only about 180 view total) I'm not too worried about it.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2010
  7. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    And yet he really didn't address the OP with anything specific in terms of hardware and software that works well with GarageBand. The Zoom units can probably work, but I've read that they don't work so well as a preamp to record directly into Garage Band, and that's what the OP asked. I also gathered that the OP is looking for an inexpensive solution, in which case even the Zoom units might be outside of reach.

    While maybe not ideal, the XLR to USB converters like the MXL Mic Mate or the Blue Icicle are within reach with a budget level dynamic mic - with the Behringer XM8500 SM58 clone, it puts everything below $100 and makes use of software he already has on his computer. He doesn't "need" a treated room, and with some experimentation with mic placement, gain levels and EQ in Garage Band, he'd get better than decent results.
     
  8. Dragon98987

    Dragon98987 Pianissimo User

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    Thanks Patrick for all the helpful info I think I'm going to go with the preamp-mic system.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2010
  9. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    You mean like I did - that's my Youtube vid - not Ed's.

    You can use the Zoom as a preamp and mic, but you might need to get another mic if you are going to use it just as a preamp.

    Don't classify it at all - worry about getting a good clean signal into the computer - you can make necessary adjustments after you have the tracks in your DAW during mixing.

    A lot of it depends on your budget. IMO it would be hard to go wrong with a decent preamp interface and an SM57 to get you started. The SM57 is still one of the single-most versatile microphones in use today - it's what's still used on the Presidential lectern. They aren't terribly expensive and they can be used either on stage or in the studio and as either an instrument or vocal mic - they are a go-to mic for miking guitar amplifiers. LD condensers get into the 4 figures, and even the 5 figures for some of them, like maybe a vintage Telefunken U47, and they aren't as easy to use because they need a sound treated room, and a better than average signal chain, which means $$$. For someone just getting started (like me - I've read a lot more than I actually know firsthand) an SM57 is going to be more than enough to get you going.
     
  10. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    The Wikipedia article or something similar may have been the source for my data that I've put in the memo book for my own recording of it. The only difference is the "close friends and family" that have heard my rendition. It is NOT included on A Christmas Brass Performance that I'm considering getting my mechanical copyright licenses for a CD release. (This year ... next year ???) I'm still circulating The Christmas Collection CD as is all public domain songs.

    Ain't my problem ... it's yours. No peformance of mine is heard in public for which I've not secured the appropriate copyright license.
     

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