Recovery time

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by ricecakes230, Jan 23, 2014.

  1. ricecakes230

    ricecakes230 Pianissimo User

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    Jan 15, 2013
    Texas
    I don't mean to make spam since I just made a post 2 days ago, but as of now I don't have a lesson teacher to ask questions. Temporary leave for the army I think. ANYWAY, I am in the 9th grade, started 6th grade. Since 8th grade to 9th I was expecting to get off of 1st part and into 2nd or 3rd part since I was moving into a high school band. Strangley this is not the case, I have music that require "Man Chops" and "Manly Brass". The music has notes like sustaining the F on top of the staff, some high G's, (just right above the staff not 6 ledger lines above), high A's and occasionally high B's. This is basically 1st part. I know most of ya'll are pros but for me this can wear out my chops pretty quick. The music also incorporates some fast rythmes that requires my air to change rapidly. This is tough stuff to practice. I do some smooth Chikowitz flow studies, and thats about it for my warm up. I also add in some buzzing. I keep my warm up short because, if it goes any longer I won't have the chops to practice everything I need to practice. I practice everyday, and after about an hour of practicing my lips are tired. Not to the point where I can't make a sound, but the sound convey's my fatigued chops. I was wondering if I should practice like this everyday, or practice the hard stuff today, go easy on the chops tomorrow. I want to have good improvement in my endurance to play the music but I want to make sure that I am giving myself good recovery and not just killing my chops. I've heard people practice till they're tired, and the next day they just play some easy going long tones or some fun music and let the chops recover like that. What's the most efficient way?
     
  2. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Ricecakes230, you are in no way posting too much, so you can rest easy. I once read in an interview that the muscles we use include the ones that wolves use to show their fangs and horses to move their ears around. Trumpet playing is not intuitive--not a natural act, and it takes more than three years to feel real comfortable with the trumpet.

    As for your routine, I would suggest practicing hard (tired but not exhausted) six days a week. I would take one of the weekend days off. This should give you enough recovery time.

    Keep up the good work!
     
  3. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    When you practice rest as much as you play in between exercises.
    I always end with 3 sets of descending arpeggios
    C ( below the staff) .. down to G (below the staff) pedal E .. then pedal C ... I think it helps get the blood flowing and lessens the tightness on the next day. I will also tell you that this is up for debate ... I swear by it some don't.
     
  4. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    Being young is an advantage to you - there's good advice from the above posters. Nearing age 50 I find a day of difficult pracgice followed by a day or two of easier stuff is beneficial for me (worst case scenario for me is a 4 day recovery) --- 1 other thing, you should practice the difficult stuff, it might not always sound good - but if every practice was perfect you wouldn't improve
     
  5. ricecakes230

    ricecakes230 Pianissimo User

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    Jan 15, 2013
    Texas
    Thanks. Can you suggest something about my warm-up? or should i just chikowitz everyday and thats it.
     
  6. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    I'll just echo VB you are not posting too much the only way to learn is to ask questions, it is a shame you don't have a teacher anymore but such is life. He is right about practising until you are tired but not exhausted
     
  7. ricecakes230

    ricecakes230 Pianissimo User

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    Jan 15, 2013
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    Any opninion on how long or how I should maybe adjust my warmup? I would love to play some range excersizes out of the arban book but, that will wear my chops out a bit..
     
  8. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Apr 5, 2011
    Hi ricecakes,
    You asked:
    "I have music that require "Man Chops" and "Manly Brass". The music has notes like sustaining the F on top of the staff, some high G's, (just right above the staff not 6 ledger lines above), high A's and occasionally high B's. This is basically 1st part."
    ---
    Nope, it doesn't require "manchops" or "manly brass". It takes a serious investment in proper development. Granted, it is hard to get away from the man-esque persona that surrounds the trumpet. Why it is there, I don't know.
    Possibly it is rooted in the misleading idea that it takes brute force and power to play the trumpet and true, a trumpet can be played using this approach but the result generally sucks. Having good endurance is a matter of developing a routine. How do we do that? By measuring what we practice (a well rounded routine) and for how long ( see Practice Tips Wynton Marsalis).
    -----
    "The music also incorporates some fast rythmes that requires my air to change rapidly. This is tough stuff to practice. I do some smooth Chikowitz flow studies, and thats about it for my warm up. I also add in some buzzing. I keep my warm up short because, if it goes any longer I won't have the chops to practice everything I need to practice. I practice everyday, and after about an hour of practicing my lips are tired. Not to the point where I can't make a sound, but the sound convey's my fatigued chops. I was wondering if I should practice like this everyday, or practice the hard stuff today, go easy on the chops tomorrow."
    ------------
    That's a good question.
    I find that when a person is getting tired (around an hour or so), they are often using some mechanic (method of playing) wrong. More often than not, it's the improper use of air that causes a person to wear out. You'd be amazed at how "not" exhaling and putting fresh air on top of old air can physically wear a person out. I've seen people so full of air they looked as if they were going to burst but still were running out of air. That is because they didn't take the time to "exhale!". never put fresh air on top of old air. In addition, if a person has no idea how the song should sound, then the work is twice as hard. To fix that, simply write the piece using some free music softwear and then listen to it so you get get a hang of how it goes. Everyone's ability to read music varies and sometimes it's hard to hear the big picture when the person is struggling with one measure at a time. By writing it down and listening to it, that problem is solved.
    -------
    "I want to have good improvement in my endurance to play the music but I want to make sure that I am giving myself good recovery and not just killing my chops. I've heard people practice till they're tired, and the next day they just play some easy going long tones or some fun music and let the chops recover like that. What's the most efficient way?"
    -------
    You tell us. My idea of recovery time is about an hour, maybe two. That'll give me enough time to wolf down a sandwich and beverage, take a shower and then get back to it. Your recovery time should be based on how you feel. While we don't want you to kill yourself, we also know that developing endurance is a matter of pushing one's self a little further each time. That's where proper mechanics are the key to survival. Just think. Mendez would play all day long. His wife knew he needed to eat so she would come into his practice room, take the horn out of his hands and make him eat a sandwich. Shortly after the sandwich, he would be back to practicing.
    Alison Balsom speaks about playing endlessly and the importance of proper technique. So, that takes me back to my original statement, "You tell us"
    Hope this helps
    Some good information can be found on this site and here are three:
    Ray of Power by VB (a good source of where the force needs to come from. I find it very useful)
    Circle of Breath(Possibly the most important read on the site. Remember, bad air = poor endurance)
    The Basics Sheet(A handy way to monitor one's self while they practice)

    Dr.Mark
     
  9. ricecakes230

    ricecakes230 Pianissimo User

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    Jan 15, 2013
    Texas
    Dr.Mark, when you mentioned using proper mechanics are key to survival, I took it as mean if I am tired and I want to push myself an extra meter or two, it is still crucial to maintain the air, posture, mouthpiece pressure, etc. I have a 45 minute band class in school, but of course the director works with other sections sometimes so I am not tired after class. When I get home and when my homeworks done, I practice an hour or so.

    When I am tired and I want to push myself a little further like you said, what kind of stuff should I play? I think it's obviously I shouldn't test my range or do any range related exercises when my chops are tired. (But I could be wrong)
     
  10. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Apr 5, 2011
    Hi ricecakes,
    You asked:
    "When you mentioned using proper mechanics are key to survival, I took it as mean if I am tired and I want to push myself an extra meter or two, it is still crucial to maintain the air, posture, mouthpiece pressure, etc. I have a 45 minute band class in school, but of course the director works with other sections sometimes so I am not tired after class. When I get home and when my homeworks done, I practice an hour or so.
    -----
    How do you define "maintain the air?" I can not over state the importance of how we use the air.
    -----
    When I am tired and I want to push myself a little further like you said, what kind of stuff should I play? I think it's obviously I shouldn't test my range or do any range related exercises when my chops are tired. (But I could be wrong)
    -----
    Once again, you need to be the judge of this. If you are played out, then stop and rest. No good will come if you are spent. However, a routine of single, double, triple tonguing with some lip slurs would be good. Then again, playing along with an easy Aebersold play-along wouldn't be a waste of time either. Again, you need to be the judge. I do advocate playing fun stuff too. All work and no play will make ricecakes a boring lass.
    Hope this helps
    Dr.Mark
     

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