Recovery time

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by ricecakes230, Jan 23, 2014.

  1. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Ricecakes. Cat Anderson's method first starts out with long tones. He gradually builds to range increases, but then instructs after finishing a particularly grueling exercise to either go back to long tones or to take a 10 or 20 minute rest. There are many methods to achieving Cat's point, but his real message is not to allow your lips to fatigue. What do I believe Recovery time is? That depends. As long as you still have control and accurate slotting of slurs, octave exercise and phrases, the time it takes to put down your horn pet the dog, walk to the sink to empty the spit valves, etc. is all the Recover time you need. And yes if taking on a particularly challenging passage with control yet lost, the perhaps a 10 or 20 minute rest as suggested by Cat. But, if you start losing control of slotting, you are BEGINNING to fatigue and becoming dangerously close to producing strain. If you get to this phase. Stop. Step Away from the Horn. Do not play that horn until the next day. Then have at it once again. So in the situation where strain sets in, Recover time should be 24 hours.
     
  2. ricecakes230

    ricecakes230 Pianissimo User

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    By maintaining air I meant exhaling the air when needed. Not holding the breathe when I inhale. But I get it, it helped a lot. Thank you Dr.Mark!
     
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Play the radio, CD player or mp3 player... but at that point, not the horn.... Step Away from the Horn.
     
  4. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    I don't know if you're doing it now, but I'd spend some time in Arban's working on some of the technique stuff, like double tonguing and intervals. If you're tired, work on the ones that stay in the middle and lower part of the staff. At the end of your practice time, flip over to the back of the book and play a few of the short, easier melodic pieces, concentrating on relaxing your embouchure and playing musically.

    I don't know if you want to buy another book, but the Schlossberg book is really helpful in adding flexibility to your playing, making transitions within and between octaves easier.
     
  5. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    Warmups can be a waste of time. I know a few really good players that don't warm up for more than 15 seconds before playing, for real.

    I play a low C, do some slurs for about 15 seconds, then rest for about 30 seconds to a minute. Then I'll do some slurs with VERY light pressure,
    so light that you can hear a buzz coming out the corners of the mouth. I do that for maybe 30 seconds, play a low c for a couple measures and
    I'm ready.

    I learned this by watching videos of Nick Drozdoff and Jason Harrelson. Doing the "zero pressure" exercises that Nick talks about definitely
    made me overcome my need for a lengthy warm up.

    Oh, I think Wilmer Wise was another player that said he doesn't believe in long warm ups either, or "warm down". Just blow the spit out of the
    horn and go home.
     
  6. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    As far as warm up goes, I like the Heimat tone concept of my teacher, Gerald Webster.

    Gerald Webster discovered that when we play a medium high, medium low, medium loud tone on our mouthpiece first thing in the day, the same pitch will come out, our personal "home" tone, or Heimat tone (he discovered this while touring with Edward Tarr in Germany, thus the name). "Personal" means just that, each person has his/her own Heimat tone -- there is no "good," "bad" or "ideal." Just play your first tone of the day on your mouthpiece for a few days, check your pitch with a piano or your trumpet, and you've got your own personal Heimat tone.

    Some players start their warm-ups on c below the staff, then work their way upwards, but that makes any thing above c below the staff a more or less a high note. Rather than starting in the lower register, consider starting at your personal Heimat tone and expanding from there. That gives us the feeling of having more low tones to play, and fewer high ones to struggle for. After a couple minutes of expanding from the Heimat tone, you should be in pretty good shape to play.

    It is cheap and quick.
     
  7. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Hi VB,
    You stated:
    "Gerald Webster discovered that when we play a medium high, medium low, medium loud tone on our mouthpiece first thing in the day, the same pitch will come out, our personal "home" tone, or Heimat tone (he discovered this while touring with Edward Tarr in Germany, thus the name). "Personal" means just that, each person has his/her own Heimat tone -- there is no "good," "bad" or "ideal." Just play your first tone of the day on your mouthpiece for a few days, check your pitch with a piano or your trumpet, and you've got your own personal Heimat tone."
    --
    Wow!! This is great. Ill be checking this out tomorrow. Is there a particular site that can be accessed or just do what you're describing and that's all there is to it?
    Thanks so much.
    Dr.Mark
     
  8. ricecakes230

    ricecakes230 Pianissimo User

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    Thanks that sounds pretty cool. By the way Dr.Mark mentioned to me about "Ray of Powers" something you posted? I can't find it haha..
     

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