Regarding my first lesson

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Gxman, Feb 10, 2014.

  1. Gxman

    Gxman Piano User

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    Jan 21, 2010
    Thanks Vulgano. As said, I did take what the teacher told me. It was just hard in the brain because of the X, Y, Z heard. Because I am not a child, things are naturally more analyzed. Did my brain go "Yeah But..." yeah it was... however, I also made myself ignore what the brain was doing because I was teachable.

    Like stated, my whole thing is, why does Spence make it out that everyone buzzing is wrong. THATS the real question, not the buzz or not to buzz. Why could have he not just made his idea a suggestion rather than a statement. Perhaps I should be asking him!
     
  2. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    Jan 9, 2010
    East Yorkshire
    Okay GXman, you need to get to the bones of what Greg is saying, he isn't saying there is no buzz, he believes it is set up a different way and that lip buzzing on its own is not the way to go. I can easily see where4 he is coming from because if I concentrate on making the buzz it leads for me to pinching of the centre of my lips which I think we can all agree isn't a good thing. There is no question of to buzz or not to buzz it is how you get there. There is another issue, if you are teaching children (especially) and you tell them to buzz they almost imediately tuck the bottom lip under the top lip and produce a tight weak almost ineffectual buzz.

    What has happened to you on here is that you have dropped on the thing that annoys most of us more than anything else and that is trying to (apparently) find a way to wave a different theory in your teachers face, rather than accepting that there may be different ways to achieve the same result we are after all all built differently. If you listen to Greg he doesn't liek the term buzz although he does say that the standing wave sets one up. (That is for the brains of physicists to decide rather than musicians)

    Please try not to insult either Greg or Dr Mark both of who are extremely well regarded both on here and in the trumpet world
     
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  3. tfresh1

    tfresh1 New Friend

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    Jun 23, 2008
    Portland, OR
    The topic of buzzing causes a lot of controversy, mostly do to confusion about the language used when describing it. I've seen and heard so many players rail endlessly against mouthpiece buzzing because they have no idea what the rest of us are actually talking about. They say that buzzing creates a stiff and stuffy sound and is a tremendous detriment to trumpet playing. Well, yes and no. If a player was to literally make a buzzing sound into the mouthpiece while trying to play, it would sound terrible. When you play the trumpet, the lips don't actually buzz...they do vibrate, but they don't actually create an audible buzz. Nobody, not even the most fervent supporter of "buzzing" would argue that. The "anti-buzzing" players and teachers don't understand this...they think that the pro-buzzers are encouraging people to make buzzing noises into their mouthpieces, which is ridiculous. So they throw the baby out with the bathwater and dismiss the concept completely.

    There's a very famous trumpet player with a very well-known (and very good) series of method books that on one page completely admonishes the entire concept of buzzing your mouthpiece. Goes into great detail about how terrible it is and how it's one of the worse possible things you can do. Then, on the very next page, he tells his readers to begin their routine by buzzing long tones and simple lip slurs and continues to describe how incredibly valuable mouthpiece buzzing is. This is a world-class player who really knows what he's doing, not some internet hack, but his writing clearly demonstrates that there is considerable confusion about what in the world we are all talking about.

    Because of this, I've started using the expression "playing your mouthpiece" instead of "buzzing your mouthpiece." Immediately removes most of the confusion (and controversy). For the record, I only know one world-class player who doesn't incorporate some sort of "mouthpiece playing" into their routine, and even he recognizes that it works for most players, but just doesn't do anything for him. Greatly improves your intonation, ear training, tone, range and endurance by getting you playing in the center of the pitch.

    Listen to your teacher.
     
  4. Gxman

    Gxman Piano User

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    Jan 21, 2010
    Thank you for that. That does help understand the concept a little better. I know I dont buzz my lips as such, even my teacher said not to practice the embouchure/buzzing 'off' the mouthpiece because muscles/buzzing etc will not do what it is supposed to. So buzzing on mouthpiece (take mouthpiece off = no buzz) is 'playing the mouthpiece'?

    Once again thanks for clearing some stuff up.
     
  5. tfresh1

    tfresh1 New Friend

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    Jun 23, 2008
    Portland, OR
    Yes :-)
     

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