Region music problem, not sure what to do here?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by mummytuf, Sep 6, 2013.

  1. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Lagos, Nigeria
    Returning to the thread - I believe I've sussed the problem (mine anyway) principally from study of Place of articulation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia and

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    Apparently, I form my 'k' with an epiglottal/pharyngeal articulation (locations 10 & 12) using my neck muscles rather than my tongue. Not only does this articulation lack the necessary tongue movement for multiple tonguing, but repetitive constriction of the throat leads quickly to tension in the neck and shoulders and a squeezed airflow. Since I form hard 'g' in a similar location, maybe even further back, this also explains why I never had any joy with "da-ga-da-ga-da-ga" either.

    After a bit of practice, I find I can raise the back of my tongue to give a contact roughly between locations 8 and 14, relax my neck and get a series of reasonable velar plosive "ku-ku-ku"s down the instrument.

    This 'arching', though a bit strange at first, doesn't cause undue strain. It also puts my tongue tip naturally at the gumline of my lower teeth rather than above them, which seems to ring a bell with some other bits and pieces I've read recently.

    It's a pity I didn't find this out 40 years ago!

    Now I've to decide whether it's worth investing a couple of years' practise in developing a technique I've managed to do without until now.

    Many thanks to all contributors on this thread. It's been a great learning experience for me and I am genuinely most grateful.
     
  2. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    East Yorkshire
    By the way a Fern Curl is a telephone conversation in Kingston upon Hull (Come on I want people to stop calling the City " 'ull " in a derisory tone, especially if we want the city of culture bid to go forward)
     
  3. tjcombo

    tjcombo Forte User

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    Melbourne, Australia
    So my telecommunications reference was on the money?

    I think I've been to ooll. It didn't seem too ostile :-)
     
  4. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    East Yorkshire
    Yes an Aussie got it right (but we still have the little urn)

    Your right Hull is a very nice city which suffers from a bad reputation and being the back end of the M62. I have aquiantances from York the turn their noses up at the very word, (much like me saying Lancashire, only I do that in jest) They do the same with Goole, one person I know spent 15 minutes deriding Goole and how rough and untidy it is and then admited he had only driven through it once (and even then he had only driven on a road that avoid the town centre) I frequent the town and find it not the prettiest place but a heck of a lot more friendly than Glorious, Beautiful, Wonderful York (or should I say theme park EboracuVik)
     
  5. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Aug 7, 2013
    Lagos, Nigeria
    I've done some bits and bobs at this since, but really only gone at it seriously over the last couple of days, so maybe 20-30 hours total practice time.

    Using a simple pattern of two beats of full-measure quavers (eighth notes) followed by two beats of double-tongued semi-quavers (sixteenth notes) repeated ad infinitum on low C, and using too-koo-too-koo for the articulation, I could concentrate firstly on keeping a steady airflow. Then secondly, hitting the notes hard enough to get the bell really bouncing both built the strength of the 'koo' and made it easier to check that all articulations were hitting equal resonance.

    Only increasing speed when I was just about matching the tone quality of my single-tonguing, I'm now going beyond my max speed for that (semiquavers at ~132 bpm). Given that yesterday I was only reaching around 108, a couple more weeks and I should be getting somewhere.

    So thanks again, everybody. It would have been better to know this stuff 45 years ago, but better late than never :-)
     

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