Removing Epoxy Lacquer

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by BrassBandMajor, Sep 18, 2015.

  1. BrassBandMajor

    BrassBandMajor Fortissimo User

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    Well, I have 232 Yamaha and most of the horn is worn out the lacquered areas and the silver areas too.
    I would like to strip the EPOXY lacquer any budget-friendly ways or DIY at home ways?
    I first will test the methods you supply with the finger ring.
    Very hot water strips 1mm sized lacquers.....
     
  2. stumac

    stumac Fortissimo User

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    Very hot water will strip the old nitro-cellulose lacquer, air drying enamels will strip with a methyl chloride or caustic soda base, Epoxy finishes can be very difficult to remove, mechanical abrasion sometimes is the only way. There is a very nasty product called EPISOLVE that causes the epoxy to go soft and be able to be removed, I have used it to unecapsulate electronic equipment, it must not be breathed and preferably done in a fume cupboard. NOT recommended for home use.

    Regards, Stuart.
     
  3. BrassBandMajor

    BrassBandMajor Fortissimo User

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    Any different ways?
    Hot water with baking soda or homemade oven cleaners?
     
  4. stumac

    stumac Fortissimo User

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    If it is a true baked epoxy finish there is no easy way of removing it other than what I suggested above, hot water and baking soda is fine for cleaning silver plated instruments, does nothing to epoxy. The same for home made oven cleaners. Boiling for several hours in a strong caustic soda solution may help, I take no responsibility for what might happen to the brass. The only method I would suggest at home is to get some sheets of 400-600 grit wet or dry paper and sand the epoxy off with these, leaves a matt finish.

    Best of luck.

    Regards, Stuart.
     
  5. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    If you have ever made a brass mirror you might then keep sanding with finer grit sandpaper to 2000 grit then finish it off with a wool buffer. I've done this for a flat mirror, not sure I'd have the extreme patience to do it for a curved trumpet with lots of hard to get to places.

    --bumblebee
     
  6. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    Caustic and BRASS do not go well together...your Brass will disappear, and you will be left with an Epoxy shell.... seriously do not use Caustic with Brass.
    There are really horrible strippers for Epoxy coatings - plastic bead blasting or abrasion, but I would not do it myself. Nitrocellulose and boiling water - that's the limit for the DIY.
     
  7. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    FYI check compatibility between Brass and Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH) - just don't do it.... I've done it!! - in an Industrial sink with a Brass valve under the sink... Never again - the Caustic ate the Brass valve out, and I had a huge spill to deal with.
     
  8. gunshowtickets

    gunshowtickets Forte User

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    These replies bring the lulz.
     
  9. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    ENSOLV maybe? Haven't had much joy with heartburn remedies on epoxy :D

    The old standby - dichloromethane - was outlawed as a paint stripper base by the EU about 5 years ago.
     
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  10. Ed Kennedy

    Ed Kennedy Forte User

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    There is a stripper available in the states from paint stores called Aircraft Strip. It contains methylene-chloride. It is nasty, it will burn your skin and probably fry your liver. If you find it, use it outside, brush on, let sit and hose off someplace where you want things to die. (wear protective gloves, rubber apron, goggles and a respirator - charcoal filters).
     

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