removing lacquer

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by hhsTrumpet, Jan 6, 2013.

  1. hhsTrumpet

    hhsTrumpet Piano User

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    Dec 3, 2011
    California
    I would like to remove the lacquer from my Yamaha ytr-2335 without spending too much money. What would be the best way to do this?
     
  2. Brad-K

    Brad-K Piano User

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    Jun 18, 2011
    Two methods...

    1. Ocy-acetyline torch...basically use the cutting torch (about 2600 degrees F), and burn the lacquer off. ....Make sure you have adequate ventilation, and a fire extinguisher standing by....also some ice, and burn gel....and a phone ready to dial 911.

    2. Purchase emery-board nail files......carefully and methodically sand the finish from your horn. Hope you are young.....and very patient.

    Good luck......you'll need it.
     
  3. Dave Mickley

    Dave Mickley Forte User

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    there are several better methods - bathe your horn in extremely hot water, get some aircraft stripper from the auto parts store [use only outside] and some people use oven cleaner. if you decide on either of the last 2 methods be sure to wear rubber gloves, eye protection and in a very ventilated area. Good luck.
     
  4. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    Leave it alone, you're not gaining anything. Those guys who rave about raw brass are hearing things you never will with that horn. Just play it.

    Tom
     
  5. hhsTrumpet

    hhsTrumpet Piano User

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    California
    I'm not stripping the lacquer for the sound. It has a lot of scratches and my sweat has ate through the lacquer in some parts, so might as well take it all off. It would look better that way. Just my opinion.
     
  6. whyit

    whyit New Friend

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    Aug 12, 2012
    Corona CA
    I used aircraft stripper. It took a couple of treatments but it got into the nooks and crannies. I am very familiar with chemical stripping so I was rather cofident. I put the slides in a small pail. And did the horn on a work bench. Be careful not to get the stuff on your felts or corks. Seems like it could be detrimental to them in my opinion. Just fyi, keeping a stripped horn is as much work as stripping it, well almost. Good luck.
     
  7. hhsTrumpet

    hhsTrumpet Piano User

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    What kind of maintenance will it require?
     
  8. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    I stripped a couple horns. I used Aircraft Stripper (or its equivalent) and very hot water. It worked ... but only to a point.

    It took a lot of elbow grease to get the rest off. I think is used a metal polish (like Billet Metal Polish) or Brasso for this part. Get a rag, sit in front of the TV, and start rubbing.

    EDIT: I've also used Buckaroo Cymbal Cleaner. But for a big job, I suspect the metal polish or Brasso (or something similar) will be cheaper.

    YMMV, I suppose, depending on how much lacquer is left on your horn and what type of lacquer it is.

    Mike
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2013
  9. whyit

    whyit New Friend

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    Is this a f***ing joke. He asked how to remove lacquer, not how to "C"-notch his truck. LOL.
     
  10. whyit

    whyit New Friend

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    Aug 12, 2012
    Corona CA
    As far as maintainance keeping it looking its best will require almost daily polishing, and a very thourough polish once a week. I stripped mine because it was all scratched and worn, but had no dents. It made it look like a new horn. I cant imagine a noticeable sound difference, but there are those who swear it makes the horn sound better. To each his owm.
     

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