Repair shop for NYC or Northern NJ ???

Discussion in 'Trumpet Repair and Modification' started by TuffsNotEnuff, Feb 7, 2011.

  1. TuffsNotEnuff

    TuffsNotEnuff New Friend

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    Dec 23, 2010
    I started playing again (quite badly) with a Bach CR300 cornet. The horn is a beater, but it's much better than I am. Good valves.

    Now I've gone nuts and bought a Bach 184 on impulse. This one is also a beater -- needs repairs for small dents to the shepherds crook.

    Anyway, who do you guys recommend for a repair operation in Manhattan or Northern New Jersey ?

    Also, what are typical maintenance tasks, how often are they needed, and what are typical fees ? I'm thinking about the spiffy ultrasonic cleaning. Maybe getting lacquer touched up too ?

    Thank you all. :-)
     
  2. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    Ultrasonic or Chemical cleaning is required if there is mineral build up inside the tubing. This build up affects the playing characteristics, and can also attack the Zinc in the brass causing pittingand eventual perforation of the tubing, and red rot showing on the finish.

    Re lacquering is cosmetic only, and can affect the playing characteristics because the buffing required to achieve a smooth polished surface removes metal. This removal of metal is minimized by true craftsmen. Do not send your instrument to a "metal finisher", send it instead to a brass instrument refinisher like Tom Green, Charlie Melk, Andersons, etc etc.

    I am 1 hour north of Manhattan, so do not qualify. What do you have against a drive through the verdant pastures of Northern Westchester? Tappan See bridge from NJ then up the 684 :-(

    You could try Josh Landress at Sam Ash in the polluted air of the city - give him my regards.
     
  3. Bill McCloskey

    Bill McCloskey Piano User

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    Josh Landress does all my repair work. Highly recommended. Sam Ash on 48th street.
     
  4. TuffsNotEnuff

    TuffsNotEnuff New Friend

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    Dec 23, 2010
    Thanks, guys. I called and got Josh on the phone.

    Will do.

    Since he builds his own custom horns, gotta be a winner ! :D
     
  5. TuffsNotEnuff

    TuffsNotEnuff New Friend

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    Dec 23, 2010
    Re: Repair shop >> Buckingham cornet, first

    As matters worked out I left a Buckingham cornet (stencil "Grinnell") for cleaning and repair of a minor problem in the # 1 valve body.

    Aside: The Bach was bought online. That's more story than substance. The bell still needs dent removal, so I'll contact "trumpetsplus."

    Bottom line on the Buckingham is that it was checked out, including for leaks. The horn was tight, solid and the estimate for work was $75 - $100.

    Today I picked up the horn. All three of the valves leak. Tuning valves suck air........... see follow-up comment :::
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2011
  6. TuffsNotEnuff

    TuffsNotEnuff New Friend

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    Dec 23, 2010
    Re: Repair >> Second repair

     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I'll have to admit ignorance. TIG is a welding process in my book, hardly suited for building valves back up. What am I missing?

    As far as leaky valves ruining a horn, I have a 1911 Holton long cornet with really leaky valves and it plays just fine. I will get them tightened up one day, just not in a hurry because the sound/intonation/response is so sweet!

    I can't imagine Josh removing so much material. I am sure that there is another explanation.
     

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