Repairing a solder weld?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Dave H, Jul 23, 2010.

  1. Dave H

    Dave H New Friend

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    Jul 23, 2010
    I searched but didn't see this question.

    I just purchased a used silver Bach TR300 for my son to start 6th grade band with. It has a few minor defects. One of which is the weld on the bracket nearest the mouthpiece is broken. I wanted to get some opinions on what I should do. The way I see it I could just leave it as it is. Or I could try a few drops of super glue or epoxy. Or I could take it to a repair shop. I would like the trumpet to last my son until I am convinced he is serious and old enough to use my strad.
     
  2. rettepnoj

    rettepnoj Fortissimo User

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    Repair shop...:-)
     
  3. oldlou

    oldlou Forte User

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    amen!!!!!


    Oldlou>>
     
  4. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    take it to a repair shop. have them look the horn over for anyrhing else it might need. It should have new valve felts installed. This is a good horn. If you e mail me I would be glad to send you my paper on trumpet maintainance.
     
  5. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Definitely take it to a brass repair tech. There is a definite technique to doing those kinds of repairs and they are (IMO) best left to those who really know what they are doing. They'll do it up right and it shouldn't break the bank

    Nice catch on that Bach - it's a decent trumpet that will take him well into High School.
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    When those braces break loose, there is a reason. It can be further damage, but quite often it is the manufacturing process. The instruments are assembled on jigs and if something doesn't fit just right, a bit of force is applied and then soldered. This makes a big difference in the response of the horn and is the reason that many "love" or "hate" this horn (or many other models of Bach for instance).

    When it goes to the tech, they can examine for additional damage and with little effort make the horn as good or very often better than new!

    Using glues is not recommended. They make a real repair more difficult because you have to completely disassemble and clean the gunk off first. Superglue can break loose while playing - not nice for the chops..................
     
  7. Alex_C

    Alex_C Piano User

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    Rowuk ..... pure gold.

    I'd NEVER use glue not even j-b weld, nada. Repair shop is the ONLY answer. It'll be done right and a repair guy will stand behind his work.
     
  8. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    That brace is often victim of a stuck-mouthpiece removal attempt, so there could be leadpipe/receiver damage as well. A tech will look for that.
     
  9. s.coomer

    s.coomer Forte User

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    DO NOT TRY TO REPAIR IT YOURSELF!! Take it to a repair shop and let them do their thing.
     
  10. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    To repair trumpet $x
    To undo owner's repair $6x

    Please, Please DO NOT USE EPOXY OR ANY OTHER GLUE.

    As a repairman, I have had to undo this type of mess. Bring it to any of my colleagues, as suggested earlier. They will not only fix the symptom, but will also be able to determine and rectify the underlying fault which caused this brace to let go. It could be as simple as a sloppy factory solder job just before lunch break.
     

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