Resistance vs Free Blowing

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trumpetguy27, Aug 9, 2011.

  1. patkins

    patkins Forte User

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    I was always remonded by my instructors to open my throat more. I quess it was poor technique. I used to have migraines. I noticed that by opening my throat and practiced breathing methods reduced my headaches. I agree that horns are all different. The Schilke X3 plays much more freely than My Yamaha 6335, or Bach Strad ML. However, now I play a medium bore Callet SIMA and have no problem at all. So I agree, it is more the player and technique that is critical, and try various horns before I settled on a major investment. I pray that you have no further problems with your brain and live many years. Thanks for sharing. It is encouraging to witness your courage in playing.
    God Bless.
     
  2. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I also found even more profound, that the same horn feels (and sounds) very different with a different (but similar cup sized) mouthpiece. This again demonstrates the effect of the backbore on the horn's sound.
     
  3. patkins

    patkins Forte User

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    Of course general physics applies to acoustic sound. Absolutely mouthpiece size, backbore makes a difference. That is why certain professionals will design their own. Sound waves move like a ripple
    )))), but spherical at the same time. So, obviously there is going to be variation. Applying constant pressure of air pushes sound through, on top of that metals resonate. What a beautiful creation, this trumpet.
    Generally I find one mouthpiece I like for a certain horn and stick with it.
    I may experiment with a new size for a while, but tend to stick with one
    particular one with a certain horn. Mainly it is the sound I'm looking for that determines which combo I use.
    Everyone has their own need. Everyone is different. A player could use my combo and produce a completely different sound. Why? Different teeth placement, different embouchure, longer practice. They are simply better than me. Main thing, find what you like and do it better everytime you can by practice.
     
  4. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Certainly resistance varys horn to horn and mpc to mpc, still it is just my thought that an instrument with which you are familiar and has lain unsused until your comeback is long overdue for a very extensive ultrasonic cleaning and otherwise a total "check-up".

    Also, it is imperative that you keep in touch with your own doctor(s) and discuss all sensations you feel in your head or elsewhere from playing.
     
  5. trumpetguy27

    trumpetguy27 Mezzo Piano User

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    Ok... so I went and saw one of my old instructors today... he actually likes what I am doing for the most part and really only offered two things he sees that would be causing me discomfort:

    "You're playing LOUDER than balls... back off some!!!"

    and some shoulder tension etc.

    He suggested I get "The inner game of music" and read that, says it has helped him alot lately.

    Sooo... I guess my first things to try are just backing off a little bit and relaxing... see if that helps enough before I go making more major changes.

    The bad news is that he is a music director for the Baltimore Ravens Marching Band, that I used to be a member of and he REALLY wants me to come back after hearing the "Louder than balls" playing. It's a fun "gig" but not something I'm sure I want to get involved in again... guess we will see.
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I agree with Ed Lee. I recommend you see your doctor to let him know there are headaches you are experiencing since surgery and that you are a rather agressive trumpet player. It may be necessary to to decide if these events are associated. Refer him to the following article:
    Fagan LH, Ferguson S, Yassari R, Frim DM. Pediatr Neurosurg. 2006;42(1):14-9, and ask him if this may apply to your situation.
     
  7. trumpetguy27

    trumpetguy27 Mezzo Piano User

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    I certainly appreciate and value everybody's concern about my health and contacting the doc... I have that covered. I am staying in touch with him on everything. He's given me the OK and says as long as it just stays a little bit of discomfort and I don't feel PAIN I'm ok.

    I'm not dying while playing... no severe pain at all... I'm just getting a little bit of discomfort in my upper neck/very lower head.

    More than likely it's a tension thing... I had a lot of muscles and such cut through and playing is exercising those muscles again.
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    This pressure at the back of the head is more likely related to muscle tension than physiology involving "lung pressure" which would likely result in a valsalva effect and actually drop the blood pressure. This too can cause a headache feeling from hypoxia as a result of valsalva effects and tension closing off resistance vessels. The best way to work on this is to relax while playing. This is most likely not the same situation as with the OP that is post-surgical from a congenital condition.
     
  9. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    Your loud playing could account for the discomfort you feel. back off keeping in mind that it may take a while for your lips ro get used to not blasting. They may not want to respond at first. You want your lips to be sensitive enough to respond to the least whiff of air.
     
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    That's great. Thanks for letting us know. I am so glad your doctor is aware and is on top of it. Working with the tension sounds like a great plan.
     

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