resonence

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trumpet520, Jan 25, 2007.

  1. trumpet520

    trumpet520 Pianissimo User

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    Manny and others,
    i keep hearing about and reading about haveing a resonent sound. is there a specific way to acheive this or do you just figure it out on your own?

    -thanks in advance
     
  2. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    A sound that is resonant is one that is in the center of the pitch, not lipped down flat or up sharp. If you bend a pitch as an experiment you'll notice there's a nice slot that happens when you hit the center of the pitch. When it's sharp it becomes like swiss cheese; airy. The same will happen when you bend it down flat out of center. The tone becomes lifeless, airy, and dull.

    Go for the sound that is centered. When all your notes, high, middle, and low are centered, you'll notice that you're playing with resonance.

    ML
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Playing centered starts with tuning your horn. If the tuning slide is too far in or out, you have to lip ALL of the notes to adjust with the corresponding tone quality..........
    To correctly tune the horn, you should ALWAYS play with a full sound. When you support your tone and find the corresponding tuning slide position, you have a good start. If you have a tuner, play without looking at it and then check where you are - or even better, let somebody else look. Once your tuning note (C) is ok, try the G in the staff and then the one on top of the staff (again without looking at the tuner or adjusting). If they line up, you are already in pretty good shape. The low C should also be checked.
    As you are just starting with "resonant" thinking, it could very well be that your 3rd space C and second line G are OK, but the G on top of the staff is sharp. I have seen this quite often.
    Once the tuning note C is OK, your slide is in pretty much the right position (except on some name brand C trumpets where that note is sharp!) you could use a tuner to check all the other notes - ALWAYS play first then look.
    Please note: when playing in a group, you will often have to adjust even although the tuner says that you are right. The explanation for this is a bit lengthy but is the opposite of what Bach accomplished with his "well tempered Klavier". Google or Wiki that and you will see what I mean!
    Like most other things pertaining to the trumpet: there is NO replacement for a good teacher. One lesson can be better than 50 hours of "self help" especially when you are exploring areas of playing that you are not familiar with!
     
  4. Tootsall

    Tootsall Fortissimo User

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    Yee HAW!
  5. Derek Reaban

    Derek Reaban Mezzo Piano User

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    Sam,

    I wrote an article on Resonant Sound when I was trying to get my arms around all of the different aspects that come into play when players discuss “resonanceâ€. Manny addressed one very important aspect. So did Rowuk and Ed. It’s the complete package that needs to be addressed to get closer to the desired end result. Some players have developed more bad habits than others, so more time may need to be spent on some of the ideas than others.

    Here is an excerpt from the article that I linked to:

    Definition

    This has been my favorite part in gathering information for this topic. I have spent a great deal of time reading how different authors describe this external resonant sound using words. It has been very intriguing to see how they all try to describe this same idea using a medium that is not well suited to convey the idea. Emory Remington (the legendary trombone professor at Eastman) describes a sound that "lives" while Carmine Caruso talks about the "natural feel" of the note. James Stamp, Roy Poper, and Bob Findley all approach this idea by discussing a "colorful" sound. Many authors come at this topic from the idea of a "resonant center" and activating overtones within the harmonic structure. Other terms for this sound include slot, rub, burr, energy, core, and pitch center. The two descriptions of this external resonant sound that I like the best were written by Pat Harbison (on the sound of Bill Adam) and David Monette (on the sound of the many fine players that he works with). These quotes will put us all on the same page when qualitatively describing this external sound concept.

    Pat Harbison on the Sound of Bill Adam

    • "When we talk about a 'great sound' in the context of Mr. Adam's approach we are talking about a tone that has resonance, opulence, core, richness...These are all terms that poorly describe what we are listening for. This is unbelievably hard to describe with words, but here I am on the Internet giving it a foolish try.
    • For an Adam Student a 'great sound' is one that has the entire harmonic spectrum present and balanced in the tone. When I play my long tones I feel like I am developing the fundamental and overtones in my trumpet sound as if I were standing in front of a brass choir tuning and balancing the notes of a chord until it sounds absolutely perfect. A great sound is both 'bright' and 'dark'. The full harmonic spectrum is present in every note. This is what is called resonance, center, core, and a dozen other nebulous terms by different people.
    • A great trumpet sound has nothing to do with musical style. It has everything to do with producing the complete harmonic spectrum of tone. When this (our definition of a 'great sound') happens you know that your body is working in sympathy with the physical and acoustical properties of the instrument. Adolph Herseth has this kind of sound. So does Arturo, Maynard (in the 1960s), Freddie Hubbard, Fats Navarro, Clifford Brown, Maurice Andre, Vacchiano, and Doc Severinsen. Listen to these players and see if you can find the common qualities in their tones. It is hard to describe, but easy (I think) to hear."


    David Monette on Resonance

    • "A brilliant, resonant sound is usually most desirable in acoustic performance. This is a sound that has both high and low components and in which the overtones are harmonically related to the fundamental in the spectrum being produced. A harmonic relationship between the fundamental and overtones in one's sound creates a resonance that can be felt as well as heard by the listener. This type of sound usually has the potential to make a more lasting musical impression on the audience. (Many of the finest players) talk about wanting as much 'rub' or 'burr' or 'energy' in their sounds as possible. This quality gives their sound clarity, presence, and projection."


    Something that made a big difference to me was understanding that the sound that is heard from behind the bell is much different than the sound that is heard in the hall. Trying to generate a “big, orchestral, loud†sound from behind the bell may be misleading, especially outdoors or in a room that is acoustically dead.

    Getting the sound to ring with vibrancy (especially in the upper register) is much more about creating the most PURE sound possible (which may appear softer from behind the bell). This is done by taking a full but relaxed, pressurized breath, and simply letting the air out. Be in alignment with the instrument, be in tune, have a great internal sound concept, etc. I could go on and on…
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2007
  6. trumpet520

    trumpet520 Pianissimo User

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    Oct 25, 2006
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    thanks for all the great help
     
  7. Phil Rinaldi

    Phil Rinaldi New Friend

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  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Hey Phil,
    I don't recall any other Van Cleave players on this site. Can you give us in the "Horns" forum some of your personal Van Cleave instrument experience? We know that every player thinks that his ax is the best - and most of them are right! Let us know what is wonderful about yours! We don't need an ad but I am sure there are things that you adore about your horn, and that interests me.
     

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