Reverse leadpipe Vs non reversed leadpipe?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by the newbie, Mar 18, 2012.

  1. the newbie

    the newbie Pianissimo User

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    This is probably a really stupid question to you guys but what is the difference between reversed leadpipe and non reversed. Apart from being reversed. And what is the general preference of players?

    What are the pros and cons of reversed leadpipe? I heard that Bachs are not reversed. Could it be possible that a player might be better on a non reversed lead pipe?
     
  2. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    Pros: My trumpet has one. I love them. More free blowing. Looks better.

    Cons. Nothing. Its just a tuning slide.


    Bachs do have reversed tuning slides, the "R" models are. 43R and 25R are the reversed.

    A reversed is cheaper to make for a horn. There is not really a lot about them. What specific questions do you have?
     
  3. the newbie

    the newbie Pianissimo User

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    Well this goes back to the "trumpet change" post about a horn filling up with water/spit and i noticed my 6320s fills up with water a lot! So i put it down and picked up my old King 600 and noticed that hardly any water filled up in the tuning slide but a little more filled in the valves. I continued playing with the King for 3 days and I love it more than ever now!! Even more than my Yamy. It sounds mellower but i can still get it to go loud, doesnt fill with water and gargle. My conclusion is that its maybe the reverse leadpipe which makes the yamaha fill with water.

    Maybe i dont like reverse leadpipes! i dont think i do.
     
  4. the newbie

    the newbie Pianissimo User

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    Opps just noticed a similar post...sorry.
     
  5. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    I dont think the tuning slide is not the cause. Many people use reverse tuning slides. I have one on my YAMAHA 6340ST and I find that it does not fill up as fast. It is just you putting a little more spit in the horn. Like Rowuk said, it could be the horn angle.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2012
  6. shooter

    shooter Piano User

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    I think there may be more to it than Horn angle. I just acquired a Super Olds and I can play five times longer before emptying the horn than my Lawler C7. The angle may have some of a factor, but no way can it account for that big a difference alone.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2012
  7. Jerry Freedman

    Jerry Freedman Piano User

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    What exactly is a reversed lead pipe
     
  8. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    It is where the leadpipe tuning slide goes over the leadpipe then into the horn at the valve block tube. I will post a pic of my horn below. The first pic shows the bracing, notice that it farther away from the bell then normal bracing and it is almost touching the valve block. The second shows the tuning slide. You will see the start of the tuning slide is close to the valves right after the pinky ring and it ends after the water key in the same place as a normal tuning slide. The benifits are that the brace is farther back letting the bell ring more and the internal tubing does not add resistance vs a normal one.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  9. altpt

    altpt New Friend

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    It's more open (free) blowing.
     
  10. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    The two main differences are:
    Cheaper to manufacture, but able to be sold at a premium due to a supposed "wow" factor.

    The brace between the lead pipe and the bell has to be closer to the valves, making the bell a little unstable.
     

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