Reverse leadpipe Vs non reversed leadpipe?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by the newbie, Mar 18, 2012.

  1. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    Interesting thread. I read that the slotting on reversed tuning slide trumpets was more flexible. Yes? No?
     
  2. stumac

    stumac Fortissimo User

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    With horns with standard and reversed upper leg of tuning slides and an Eclipse whose one piece leadpipe continues to the valve block, I cannot say I can tell any difference. The nearest horns I can compare are a Selmer B700 LB and Selmer Concept TT.

    I have one horn, a Selmer-Ferron with a conventional upper leg a reversed lower with a tapering bow. this is my most open and responsive horn.

    Regards, Stuart.
     
  3. musicalmason

    musicalmason Forte User

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    In my opinion the biggest differences of reversed leadpipes are 1. The taper of the leadpipe extends farther 2. Placement of the front bell brace. Some people say reversed leadpipes remove the "bump" from one slide leg to another. That is not true, it just moves it a little farther down the horn. The playing differences caused by these differences, in my opinion, do not hold consistency from horn to horn, rather effect different horns differently. I have seen reversed leadpipes on the same model be more open and more responsive and reversed leadpipe models be dead and dull. Depends on the horn, depends on what kind of day the person doing the assembling was having.
     
  4. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    The taper does not extend further. Once you get to the tuning slide inners and outers the tubing is, by definition, cylindrical. One cannot slide tapered tubes.

    One of the main differences between the two is that reverse lead pipe configurations are cheaper to manufacture than traditional setups.
     
  5. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    I think this is one of those 'aha' moments...
     
  6. musicalmason

    musicalmason Forte User

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    No aha here. Is it not possible to make tubing with cylindrical bearing surfaces and tapered innards? I'm pretty sure that exisists, and I'm pretty sure it is more expensive to produce than standard cylindrical tubes.
     
  7. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    Yes it is possible. However, just consider how thick the tubing (the whole lead pipe) needs to be before the outside is machined straight. A typical lead pipe is only around 0.020" thick.
     
  8. musicalmason

    musicalmason Forte User

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    Agreed. You are right. I just checked 3 different reversed leadpipe horns I have right now, all straight tapers in the upper leg. When I'm wrong, I'm wrong. I guess I just assumed that makers were using this possibility to the advantage. Someone, somewhere must be. It is just a good idea, it makes so much sense. That said, I don't completely buy into the "they do it because it is cheaper" mentality. If that was true, why wouldn't all the makers who just make student trumpets be doing it? I have never seen a student trumpet with a reversed leadpipe, and they are built with cost in mind...just doesn't make sense.

    So besides cost, the differences must be all about brace placement then...I have done some mods like this for many players in my area, moving braces around to find the "sweet spot". One player was looking to turn her standard 37 into more of a leadhorn. I replaced the front bell brace with an olds style 3 piece brace and positioned it a little farther back closer to the valves. Turned that horn into a laser beam, very bright.
     
  9. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    Check out the Yamaha Advantage. It not only has a reverse lead pipe, but also brushed lacquer which hides anomalies in surface finish....
     
  10. hixsta

    hixsta New Friend

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    Just to throw a spanner in the works. Are 'rounder' tuning slides more free blowing? And therefore are they worth the money?

    Would a reverse leadpipe with a rounder tuning slide be freer? And what is "Freer" and how does that effect the sound? There must be a cost...
     

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