Reversed leadpipe

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by gerry, Aug 27, 2010.

  1. gerry

    gerry New Friend

    20
    0
    Jul 8, 2010
    England
    Hello
    I recently bought a YTR8335RGS and the ease of playing is unbelievable imho.
    My range has gone from a solid high D to a solid high F with a little squeeky double G:-)
    The reversed leadpipe makes the trumpet so easy to play so why don´t all trumpet players use trumpets with reversed leadpipe?
    Thanks
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2010
  2. keehun

    keehun Piano User

    378
    6
    Feb 4, 2010
    Minnesota
    MAYBE SOME OF US DON'T WANT TO BE WEAK, LOOKING FOR EASIER WAYS OUT.



    Just kidding, I'm teasing. (oh yeah don't feed the trolls)

    While I don't have a great answer, I'm pretty sure it's because it changes how the horn sounds?

    Easier =/= Better Sound

    Keehun
     
  3. bagmangood

    bagmangood Forte User

    It could be that the horn suits you better - its not the reverse leadpipe that does that...
     
  4. Outkastah

    Outkastah Pianissimo User

    177
    2
    Aug 29, 2009
    Boston
    Some players prefur regular because it adds a edge to the sound, where the reversed is a little more mellow... this was my understanding of it anyways. Also your added range might just be because of the fact you are playing an over all better horn its not JUST the leadpipe.
     
  5. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

    3,185
    976
    Mar 21, 2006
    Toronto
    The reverse leadpipe is only a part of the whole picture.
     
  6. Octiceps

    Octiceps Pianissimo User

    114
    0
    May 5, 2010
    San Jose, CA
    That's very true. When I got my reversed leadpipe Bach Strad 37, I compared it to a standard leadpipe Bach 37 and found that tone was more diffused, mellow, and didn't project as well. However, I still got it anyway because it was better than the standard Bach (for me) in almost every other way.
     
  7. dhbailey

    dhbailey Piano User

    493
    4
    Jul 28, 2009
    New Hampshire
    Since no instrument can be truly cloned for a scientific test, the reversed leadpipe on one example of a particular model can't really be compared to a standard configuration. Just as you can't really play one trumpet and expect all others of that same model and configuration to play equally as well (or poorly).

    You got an instrument which suits your playing just fine and it happened to have a reversed leadpipe, that's all you can really conclude.

    Enjoy your instrument -- it's always so much fun to play when we've got an instrument that allows us to realize our potential and to grow.
     
  8. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

    Age:
    68
    3,014
    3,582
    Jun 11, 2006
    South Salem, NY
    The big difference a reversed lead pipe makes is that there is little choice in positioning the front lead pipe to bell brace.
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,611
    7,954
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    The reverse leadpipe is not what makes the trumpet easier to play - unless the power of suggestion from the marketing people falls on gullible ears.

    I do not use reversed leadpipe horns because I find the tone spreads more easily. This is due to the front bell brace being much further back and the less supported tuning slide. I would be possible to build a reversed leadpipe horn with better control of the sound, I just haven't found one yet from any manufacturer.
     
  10. Kayin

    Kayin Pianissimo User

    162
    1
    May 30, 2010
    I'll agree with the above on bracing. However, there's little reason the bracing COULDN'T be better, though it's no argument it isn't. Maybe I need to go back in the lab...

    It is a more diffuse tone, much like my unbraced C trumpet. That thing needs some work still...
     

Share This Page