Right Hand

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by alant, Sep 29, 2013.

  1. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    Hakan Hardenberger - who, by the way, is Swedish - has been a fixture in the Classical trumpet world for several decades now. In his younger years, he tended to revive old cornet solos, whereas now he is in high demand for contemporary trumpet music. He is slightly shy and a bit unapproachable, so he never developed into a media star like Jens Lindemann or Alison Balsom (or Tine Thing Helseth). But as a musician, he is irreproachable and one of the greats of this century.
     
  2. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Natural successor to Maurice Andre, IMHO
     
  3. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    I would not be too sure... his style is a bit brasher, more like Rolf Smedvig or Wynton Marsalis in his Classical days... tone-wise there is only one true successor, and that is Tine Thing Helseth (and, of course, Maurice's disciples, like Guy Touvron or Bernard Soustrot - but they are of a different generation, and on the brink of retirement themselves).
     
  4. Sofus

    Sofus Forte User

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    Yes, I know he´s Swedish, barliman, and so am I.
    I was just kidding when writing what I wrote.

    When Ed Tarr visited Håkans and my teacher Bo Nilsson here in Sweden,
    (they were good friends) we had a common lesson on natural trumpet for Ed.

    Guess which one of us that played the best . . .
     
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  5. Brassman64

    Brassman64 Mezzo Piano User

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    I would think for most people that it would be difficult not to follow the advice of established people in a profession.There are many variables to consider in playing the trumpet.Hand and finger position is one of them.Trumpets aren't generally made to fit your hand exactly.Some people have long fingers or short fingers small hands or big hands .It all comes down to comfort in positioning your fingers.The positioning that you are being taught may have to do with better dexterity and speed.I play with arched fingers and can play faster that way then I can with them flat.With every rule there are exceptions Doc for one Sergei Nakariakov is another.You need to find what works for you and your physiology and probably how to duck rulers. Good luck there is no wrong or right just your way.
     
  6. GeorgeB

    GeorgeB Mezzo Forte User

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    Take a look at Satchmo's right hand and the way his fingers slap the keys. I don't think he gives any thought as to how his fingers are positioned.
     
  7. Brassman64

    Brassman64 Mezzo Piano User

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    I'm sure that Louis Armstrong emulated the style of the players he watched as a child and then in time developed his own style which in time influenced people like Charlie Shavers and Dizzy Gillespie.In as far as finger placement and posture for a soloist in an orchestra setting look at Alison Balsom and the seemingly ease and fluidity in her technique.
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2017
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  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    To each their own... I look at the fluidity in her physic!
     
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  9. J. Jericho

    J. Jericho Fortissimo User

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    So she's a patient of yours?
     
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    One can only wish!
     

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