right of center

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by crowmadic, Jun 6, 2007.

  1. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

    688
    1
    Oct 3, 2006
    A few days this week I found myself having to shift my mouthpiece position to the right of center in order to get a vibrant sound below the staff. I'm not used to playing that way and hope it's a temporary situation that can be corrected. I play on a Conn 3C (a comfortable rounded rim), and have average size lips. Can anyone tell me what the possible causes of this can be?
     
  2. stchasking

    stchasking Forte User

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    Jun 11, 2006
    Crow,

    I play left of center. I don't have the straight across upper lip so that is how I compensate. I have trouble on low notes being consistant. I talked to Carol-Dawn Reinhart (sp) last weekend and she said to work on keeping the lower lip below the upper. She approved of me anchoring the mouth piece on the lower teeth. The horn tilts down. At least she didn't disagree. This is a work in progress. Others will help us out, no doubt. Jim
     
  3. adohanian

    adohanian Pianissimo User

    58
    2
    Feb 27, 2005
    boston
    There are many, many great trumpet players in all genres who have, and do play to one side or the other. There is nothing wrong with it if that is where you sound best.

    adam
     
  4. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

    688
    1
    Oct 3, 2006
    stachasking,
    What do you mean by "the straight across upper lip"? And what about "keeping the lower lip below the upper," where else would it be? And please explain "anchoring the mouthpiece on the lower teeth".
     
  5. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

    688
    1
    Oct 3, 2006
    I hope I get an explaination of why the right or left of center lip works better for some people. And why someone who was doing well in the center finds a need to make a change for better results in the low register..........
     
  6. Puffy A

    Puffy A Pianissimo User

    50
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    Jun 21, 2006
    Brooklyn
    If you have ever seen Denver Dill play it is pretty weird to look at, to say the least, but perhaps some of the most amazing playing I have ever heard! He destroyed the tissue in the middle of his upper lid as a youth and now uses the top on the right and pulls that over to line up with the middle on the bottom. Crazy but simply unbelievable. It isn't ideal but as long as you have some good air making a good sound...

    arlo
     
  7. stchasking

    stchasking Forte User

    1,502
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    Jun 11, 2006
    I have a woodwind players upper lip. It is a tip of tissue that has no contraction when forming an embouchure. Google "cupids bow" and you might get some pictures. It is an hereditary trait from the male side of the chromosome pair. I don't think women have it.

    On low notes I used to pull the lower jaw back which allows the lower lip to move back with it. It made the low notes sound but I didn't have any control in a musical situation. In another forum and in discussion with others at ITG the consensus was to keep the jaw forward so the lower lip supports the airflow between both upper and lower lip. I guess you would call it keeping the aperture compact or intact vertically.

    In order to keep the upper lip free to vibrate and not mash it with the mouth piece I push the jaw forward into the mouthpiece when playing. I can't do it around middle C and get the buzz but as I ascend it really helps me keep a good free vibrating upper lip. The horn tilts down now when in the past it was straight out. I am having a lot more success in the upper range and my endurance is improving. I am a work in progress.

    To the Administrator: THANK YOU FOR THE SPELL CHECKER!!!!!
     
  8. TisEkard

    TisEkard Pianissimo User

    Age:
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    Jul 28, 2006
    L.A./Orange County CA
    You should try Buzzing Basics by Thompson, it will help you keep a consistent mouthpiece placement on every note with no movement. It works really well. good luck
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
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    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    Crow,
    "more vibrant" off-center can be several things. The muscles controlling your embouchure could be asymmetrically developed. Are your lips symmetrical when you smile?
    Your tongue could be guiding the air "off-center". None of this is worth WORRYING about, but pivoting the trumpet around while playing is not necessarily desirable.
    Crooked teeth cause me to play off center.
    Cure: long tones, slurs and slurred intervals in front of the mirror. Not necessarily to "center" the mouthpiece, but to keep the mouthpiece on one spot when playing ALL registers.
     
  10. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

    688
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    Oct 3, 2006
    Thanks to all for sharing personal experience and advice.........crow
     

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