Rotary trumpet idea

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by gordonfurr1, Jun 2, 2015.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I have something much different in mind but am not so interested in making it a community event as the most important thing for me is how an instrument creates the palette of colors that I want. Very few people work at this level.

    Many of the things you are thinking about I have experimented with and will flow into my efforts. The only thing left for me to finalize is the ceramic rotary valve block. I am currently using carbon fiber for the rotary valve innards.

    A crystal glass bell would be best blown not milled in my opinion. Even your bell shape would be possible in one piece. Watching a good glass blower is a great experience in how breath support can be used in very much unrelated ways to our playing.

     
  2. gordonfurr1

    gordonfurr1 Forte User

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    I would suppose the crystalline structure might be finer when blown, but would an annealing process perhaps yield a blank with possibly similar properties? Are there any glass experts out there reading this thread that can clarify? I would fear that blowing the bell, and especially the whole of the bell tube, would be difficult to make highly consistent parts.
    Help please.
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Don't forget, it is the imperfections compared to theory that make a trumpet work as well as it does. Perfect adherance to horn theory would make a very efficient horn but we would suffocate while playing because we couldn't get rid of our air. The imperfections also make 4th space E/Eb
    in tune and g on top of the staff not too sharp.

    Don't forget, they can blow into a mold.

    I was at Gerd Dowids helping a colleague/student of mine pick his trumpet. They have a wonderful process where they put the valves/slides together and you pick a leadpipe first - out of a box with 50 or 100 "identical" leadpipes. They are so different, but you just keep narrowing down always comparing "yours" to their "reference trumpet". Once you have "your" leadpipe, you get a bunch of bells to finish the horn. The differences with the bell are very small, so it is more of a tweek. Bracing is the "big" magic with the bell.

    Glass does have some interesting properties - for glasses
    http://www.trumpetmaster.com/vb/f131/crystal-glass-trumpet-bells-33847.html
    Schilke Brass Clinic
    http://www.cornetconnection.com/pcb2.jpg
    RARE Parker Winds Cashel Crystal Bell Gold Plated Bb Trumpet
    https://talkingtrumpet.wordpress.com/tag/cashel/
    https://scontent-fra3-1.xx.fbcdn.ne...=7059d6fc8dbe3af36e2ee6d528ed36b8&oe=56435F28

    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Marcinkiewicz-Company/446221842057939?fref=photo
    then scroll down to 5 September 2014.


     
  4. tk1031

    tk1031 Pianissimo User

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    That is a lot to digest. I actual got on today to respond to a different thread... Rimless bell: I don't like it. I've played them, and I have made a few: to fragile, and there is something missing, probably the feedback.

    Copper bell, ok... that I do like. I like a fat dark sound. As for the rest of this... Like I told Gordon: I plan on making this thing. Even if I don't put the triggers etc on it. And there are a lot of factors that go into this design, and considerations... but it is essentially anyone's favorite piston trumpet with rotary valves. With a much different way to hold it of course.
     
  5. gordonfurr1

    gordonfurr1 Forte User

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    A SIMPLER, LIGHTER VERSION...SHOWING A COPPER BELL AND BELL TUBE.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The trigger on the third valve is more or less standard fare for a flugelhorn.
    I am not in love with the rimless bell. On a heavy horn, there would probably be enough control to keep the sound from breaking away at mezzo forte. Anything lighter, I would assume that a crescendo to loud would be tough to control.
     
  7. gordonfurr1

    gordonfurr1 Forte User

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    Hard to see but I added a rim. A trigger could be installed if desired...and if installed, a spit valve should also be.
    BTW..I also took your advice about the orientation of the spit valve on the main slide...rotated 15 degrees...but could be at any angle. Thank you for the advice.
     
  8. gordonfurr1

    gordonfurr1 Forte User

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    Sort of like this...
    [​IMG]


    And yes, I forgot to rotate the spit valve on the number three valve slide...I fixed that now on my drawing software.
     
  9. nieuwguyski

    nieuwguyski Forte User

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    George, I will say no more than wait until you receive the Vocabell to judge. Those bells are two-piece, thick, and plenty strong.
     
  10. gunshowtickets

    gunshowtickets Forte User

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    You know what? I wonder if i can go down to Jamestown and see if they can make a glass bell for my AMI horn...
     

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