Rubbed/ Brushed Brass Finish

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by RUFocused, Jul 6, 2009.

  1. RUFocused

    RUFocused Pianissimo User

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    Apr 26, 2009
    Cedar Rapids, IA
    Ok, so theoretically, What you be the best way to do it AND once it is done, could a clear laq. be put over it to help with the tarnishing? or just wax it?

    Cheers
    Jason
     
  2. A.N.A. Mendez

    A.N.A. Mendez Utimate User

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    If you need to strip the lacquer because it is mostly gone or has other issues, do it. I like the green citrus spray at Walmart, then I like to do a hand polish. Use a good cutting/cleaning polish 1st such as "Brite Boy" (Google it) and then after that is done go at it again with a fine jewelers polish such as MAAS (Again Google it) . After you finish you must wash each part, tubes and small part and wipe down with a soft cotton cloth. Good luck. If you need any more info PM me.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. ComeBackKid

    ComeBackKid Fortissimo User

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    Yorba Linda, CA
    I have tried to create the 'satin' or 'brushed' or 'scratched' finish (whatever name you want to give it) using scotchbrite or steelwool and the problem that I have run into is making the finish uniform over the entire horn. I simply cannot reach down into the tiny crevices and the back-side of the 1st tuning slide, and between the valve casings with enough control to make everything look uniform. It comes out spotty and uneven. I have not tried the bead blasting method but cannot see any other method which might give an acceptable finish so I must be missing something.

    RUfocused: A bare brass finish, whether polished shiny or brushed can be protected either with wax or a spray lacquer. The spray lacquer is difficult to do correctly unless you are a good painter and also you need to disassemble, mask, and spray all of the parts separately in order to keep the slides, valve caps, etc. from sticking together. The wax is very easy to apply and does not have the damping effect on the sound of the lacquer but wax is not permanent. It needs to be re-applied every week or two. I like the wax myself and I do it everytime I give the horn it's 'bath' plus once or twice in between and it keeps the horn looking good. Also, I use one of those 'gloves' that wraps around the valves just to keep that area from tarnishing too quickly.
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2009
  4. ComeBackKid

    ComeBackKid Fortissimo User

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    Hey! I noticed in the other thread, nearly 15 months ago, you promised some pics - did I miss them?
     
  5. stumac

    stumac Fortissimo User

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    To produce a nice uniform satin finish I use a domestic powder cleaner applied with a toothbrush and a little water, a little tedius to do the whole horn. To get into the hard to reach places I saw the brush in two lengthwise.

    Regards, Stuart.
     
  6. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    Unless its been done carelessly, a brushed finish puts very shallow grooves in the brass that are easily rubbed out to a shiny surface. Its no big deal.
     
  7. RUFocused

    RUFocused Pianissimo User

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    Apr 26, 2009
    Cedar Rapids, IA
    So... because i have never done this before lets see if I'm close
    1.) Strip remaining laq.
    2.) Use a Brass polish to clean up the horn. ??
    3.) Buy 3M product
    - Lightly and with even pressure rub/ brush in the same direction
    4.) Wax and or Laq over finish to keep it looking same and to control tarnish buildup.
     
  8. ComeBackKid

    ComeBackKid Fortissimo User

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    Yes, those are the essential steps. However, each one has its issues and tricks, such as:
    1.) Stripping lacquer is not trivial. Some of it depends on what type of lacquer it is. I have tried various strippers but I have not tried every approach you might find mentioned somewhere in this forum. My personal best success has been to combine the lacquer stripping with the tarnish removal using the "aluminum foil and sodium carbonate in hot water" method that you can find elsewhere in this forum. Note: I have found that Biz pre-laundry stain remover in boiling water along with wrapping the trumpet (valves and slides removed) in aluminum foil works well.
    2.) I use Mothers Billet polish but Turtle wax polishing compound works as well.
    3.) I have not been very successful with this approach so I have wound up polishing mine to a bright finish rather than trying the satin finish but some of the hints in this thread and others may work.
    4.) You can buy clear lacquer in a spray can in the paint section of the store. I have been leaving mine bare brass so I cannot tell you the best way to apply the lacquer but as a minimum, you need to mask all of the places where surfaces would be exposed that do not want lacquer (the valve casings, tuning slide openings, leadpipe opening, tuning slide pipes that insert into the trumpet pipes, water valves, etc. I assume that the lacquer will run like paint if not applied properly. It is difficult to tell when you have a uniform coating. Wax (I use Meguiar's Cleaner Wax) goes on easily and can be applied with everything in place on the trumpet but must be redone periodically. You might start with the wax to see if you like it. If not, you can clean it off and do the lacquer thing.
    Good luck.
     
  9. Bertotrumpet

    Bertotrumpet New Friend

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    Dec 31, 2008
    Yup! Car wax is the way to go! I reapply Every month or two.
     

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