Ruined my playing??

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by moosicles, Dec 20, 2010.

  1. moosicles

    moosicles New Friend

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    Nov 9, 2010
    Longwood, Florida
    Hi, I've recently been becoming more and more concerned about a white ring on my lips. I think I may have killed the tissue in my lips from too much mouthpiece pressure. It's been there for about a year now but it used to only be visible after I played. Now it's there all the time and It's really worrying me. I still sound fairly good everything up to Bb-C above the staff but I used to be able to do E's and F's With the same amount of difficulty. Could I have possibly ruined my playing (or be ruining it) by over excessive mpc pressure? Can I fix it, and if so, how?
     
  2. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    Take a week off?

    You don't really say anything about your routine.

    Tom
     
  3. keehun

    keehun Piano User

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    Minnesota
    I think the most important thing is to get a good teacher.

    When you get to your lesson with a super credible teacher, ask him about:

    1. Rolling in the lips, placing the embouchure to extend outside the red flesh of the lip
    2. Resting the mouthpiece on the lower jaw/teech letting the upper lip vibrate
    3. Correct practicing technique/method/etc

    I'm right now going through the same embouchure change (I can play nice up to 2 ledger line C above) but I have the pressure ring that's semi-evident in my upper lip. I am in... incredibly lucky hands as Manny Laureano's helping me with my embouchure change...

    Since this is online, the only real help I can see being prescribed is for you to find a very qualified lesson teacher who will be able to lead you through remedying this situation. If you are serious about playing, you will find a good teacher. We're also here to help you find a teacher and offer you advise/encouragement!

    keehun
     
  4. moosicles

    moosicles New Friend

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    Nov 9, 2010
    Longwood, Florida
    @vetpsychwars my routine normally consists of some warm up buzzing followed by a few Clark studies and a little arbans jumping around to whatever needs work. Then I'll go on to some etudes finishing off with some long tones and a little buzzing to warm down. Every couple days I'll throw some jazzy screams just for the heck of it going to G's above high C.

    @keehun I currently have a reputable teacher, great guy and best trumpet player I've ever seen! However I haven't had a lesson in a few weeks due to the upcoming holidays and most likely won't until 2 or 3 weeks after new years. I will definitely ask him about that though!

    Thanks for replying so fast, and for the advice
     
  5. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    Toronto
    The white ring is normal. mine is visible 100% of the time, playing or not. You can't press metal on your face and not have something happen.

    There is too much pressure, but you also do need some pressure to keep the horn on your face.
     
  6. moosicles

    moosicles New Friend

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    Nov 9, 2010
    Longwood, Florida
    So I should put a little less pressure on my face, consult my teacher and take a few days off. Okey dokey!:D
     
  7. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    Greenfield WI
    I might suggest, while you wait for after the holidays, to play the most basic exercises you have. Nothing wrong with fundamentals, right? Play those gently with the dynamics and meter as written.

    If that is hard, well, then, that shows something, no?

    Tom
     
  8. moosicles

    moosicles New Friend

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    Nov 9, 2010
    Longwood, Florida
    That's most definitely shows something. I'm pretty sure I have a folder somewhere with all the beginning excersizes my first teacher gave me. I'll have to look around and see if I can find it
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    If tissue were dead, it wouldn't remain white. If pressure were "dangerous", there would be a lot of kids with holes in their face.

    The key to success anywhere is intelligent use of resources. In the case of trumpet, a logical daily routine is required to build the habits necessary for fine playing. Those habits are built with thousands of repetitions. Without that type of dedication, pressure is the only option - with all of its limitations. Your teachers job it to help you learn how to play smart. Having a good teacher can really speed the process up.
     
  10. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Lips are not muscle--they are meat.

    The best exercise I know for reducing pressure come from John Glasel's "Relaxation Techniques for the Professional and Advanced Trumpeter."

    It involves long tones, where one reduces the pressure until the tone starts to sound really ugly, and with the same reduced pressure make it sound "better." This action works the ring muscles around the lips (remember, the lips are meat, not steak) and allows us to play with less pressure.

    Glasel's book can be purchased at: John Glasel - Relaxation Techniques for the Professional and Advanced Trumpeter - 85472 @ CedarMusic.com

    Have fun!
     

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