Satchmo's notched mouthpiece rim

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by crowmanic, Mar 12, 2018.

  1. Pinstriper

    Pinstriper Mezzo Forte User

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    OK, I'll volunteer. I'll try to do this tonite.

    It will have to be when one of the trombones isn't looking...
     
  2. J. Jericho

    J. Jericho Fortissimo User

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    Perhaps the finish would have been available in fifty shades of grey.
     
  3. King Leopardi

    King Leopardi Pianissimo User

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    Bunny Berigan had a mouthpiece with a groove in it too. Robert Dupuis talks about it in his book, "Bunny Berigan: Elusive Legend of Jazz". Gene Kutch (a pianist who had joined Berigan about 1941) related that "Bunny had this old unplated brass mouthpiece that he had had someone specifically put a groove in. It was on the bottom part, kinda like a grip. While Bunny was gone, Don Palmer (Bunny's manager) took it and had someone smooth out that groove. When Bunny came back, he picks it up and says, "Who the hell has been screwing around with my horn? Who took the groove out?" And Don says, 'I thought it was just a dent.'"
     
  4. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    There are manufacturers that do make different plastic compounds for rims. Some grip better than others others are more slippery.
    Dave Hickman's mouthpieces can be ordered with a satin finish which has a firmer grip. They are made by G&W mouthpieces.
    Rubber would likely kill needed vibrations from the lips and if you can't play without excessive pressure, the only
    cure is practice. Even the best of the best get tired from hours of playing. They have learned how to pace themselves.
     
  5. Pinstriper

    Pinstriper Mezzo Forte User

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    Of, I brought a cold chisel to rehearsal, but those crafty trombones they never let their gear out of their sight, so I was unable to see how any of them sound with a satched up mouthpiece.
     
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  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I don't think that that rim would cause any problems. We are rotating the mouthpiece while playing and the grooves are tangential.

    As far as plastic rims go, my first was from Schilke with a delrin rim. It was fine for playing outdoors.

    I don't think that the rim material changes endurance much - unless we only use pressure as a solution.
     
  7. crowmanic

    crowmanic Mezzo Piano User

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    Old friend rowuk. You really got my attention. No objection to grooves in the mouthpiece rim? "Rotating the mouthpiece while we play"? My concerns about grooves is bleeding(too much pressure or not) and air escaping. Do you mean rotating the mouthpiece by hand or by the slight movements we make with it when on the lips?
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I did not say no objection, I just think that I could easily play on the mouthpiece without shredding my lips. My major objection would be hygiene. Not so nice things can collect in the grooves...

    I would not be concerned about leakage either. Even a firm embouchure is supple, swells slightly and filld the cracks.
     
  9. Newell Post

    Newell Post Mezzo Piano User

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    Most of the "plastic" and "rubber" compounds we take for granted in today's world simply didn't exist in Satchmo's day. Maybe it was his experiment to create some low pressure areas in the rim to increase blood flow in the lips or facilitate slurring. Who knows?
     
  10. crowmanic

    crowmanic Mezzo Piano User

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    What a great question for one of the many interviews with him during his life. Of course it would have only had interest to brass players.
     

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