Saweeeeet!!!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Conn-solation, Sep 21, 2012.

  1. Conn-solation

    Conn-solation Pianissimo User

    124
    43
    Jan 22, 2011
    On my way to Bearberry Ab
    Got tickets to this...... Big Band Tonight!

    with Vizzutti and Lindemann!!!

    Just what I - maybe - need to kick start some more motivation!!! :thumbsup::D
     
  2. patkins

    patkins Forte User

    1,732
    660
    Nov 22, 2010
    Tuscaloosa, AL.
    Congrats! Have a great time!
     
  3. Conn-solation

    Conn-solation Pianissimo User

    124
    43
    Jan 22, 2011
    On my way to Bearberry Ab
    That was the MOST AWESOME concert!

    The Calgary Philharmonic, The Primetime Big Band (from Calgary) and Vizzutti and Lindemann. Unbelievable!!! What ever I play is just long tones after hearing them.


    :play: :D:D:D
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,123
    9,291
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    Vizzutti is not a fan of long tones... at least that is what he told me at a trumpet master's class I attended. I had the chance to play on stage with Mr. Vizzutti in June. We had a blast together, especially on or flugelhorn solos in Footprints. He is a fabulous player in a small ensemble as well.
     
  5. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

    875
    202
    Jul 11, 2010
    Gainesville, FL
    How does he suggest the improvement of tone?
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,123
    9,291
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    Sluring and scales, or techniques that move the note. His concern was hanging on a note for extended periods is fatigiuing to muscle and leads to lip strain.
     
  7. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

    875
    202
    Jul 11, 2010
    Gainesville, FL
    Interesting. But as Rowuk has mentioned, long tones imbue our chops with muscle memory for each pitch, and strengthens them (hence the fatigue). I wonder if there's a way to look more into Vizzutti's theories... I have his technical studies volume, but don't think it addresses long tones
     
  8. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

    16,408
    7,522
    Dec 22, 2008
    Virginia
    That's interesting. I've tried the "move the note" thing to keep it interesting vs boring. It's okay for a change of pace and I am on a hose trumpet most of the time. I do understand the concern for fatigue, but I see it more as a player using too much pressure as they tire to try and do the same thing as when fresh. I can't argue with his success (do I look ______?). I've never had an issue with lip strain and I do lots of long tones. Not changing my avatar! :D
     
  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,123
    9,291
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio

    Last word as I believe we are taking this thread of track, and that we may be splitting hairs. As a clinician an professor that teaches muscle physiology at a medical school, Vizzuti's "theories" is precise to what we know about muscle action and fatigue in physiology and medicine. The point is... at what point is fatigue achieved? This is the hair splitting concept. You can play "long tones" and not fatigue... it depends what long tone means to an individual.

    What are my "long tones". They are a series of long note slur patterns, at which I move from whole tone to whole tone in the pattern about every 3 - 5 seconds. Can you take it out longer... yes. As you take it out longer do you risk fatigue... yes. So I play it safe... 5 seconds a long tone. Would I hold long tones for 20 minutes as Cat Anderson suggests... no. Why can he do it? He's super human and for him he has trained himself to do this. Can we train ourselves to do this. Yes... if we practice hours and hours a day... The point is... I don't have hours and hours a day to do this... as I see patients in between "long tone" patterns. I can last for a 4 hour gig at a range that hangs mostly above the staff (on average) in a single night... with precision (intact muscle memory - as Rowuk has yet another good point). I am not super human, but it works for me.

    So long tones can be helpful, they can be harmful, depends on your concept of long tones, and depends on ability. Now go comb you hair.
     
  10. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

    5,065
    1,005
    Jun 6, 2010
    Oregon
    If the long tone is so long that you start to yawn, nod off or pass out ....... it's probably too long. :-P


    Turtle
     

Share This Page