Scales

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by dishul156, Mar 29, 2007.

  1. dishul156

    dishul156 New Friend

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    Mar 12, 2007
    Can someone tell me the key signatures for the E flat and A scales. I know they both contain 3. Also could u write out the note fingerings. Ex C scale) For both scales the fingerings are only need from low A to A on the staff and the same with the E scale.
    0 13 23 1 0 12 2 0
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2007
  2. Hardnut

    Hardnut Pianissimo User

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    Eb major: 3 Flats; Eb, Ab and Bb
    A major: 3 sharps; C#. F# and G#

    Eb major: 23 1 0 23 1 0 1 2...
    A major: 12 2 123 13 12 2 23 12...

    I may have made some heinous error, if so, im sure I will be put right!
     
  3. Tom Mac

    Tom Mac Pianissimo User

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    An excellent way to learn your scales is to Play "Mary had a little Lamb" starting on every note of the Chromatic Scale. "Mary" starts on the 3rd degree of the scale so, the first phrase is, in C maj, e d c d e e e. If you play the whole tune you use the first 5 degrees of the major scale. From there it's easy to supply 6 7 8(1). Hope this helps.
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Dishul,
    instead of coming to us 5-10 times for all the different scales, I offer you everything at once!
    C= nothing, G= #, D=##, A=###, E=####, B=#####, F#=######
    Notation on the treble clef staff, the first sharp is F#(top line), then C#, G#(top of staff), D#(4th line), a#(second space), e# 4th space

    F= b, Bb= bb, Eb=bbb, Ab=bbbb, Db=bbbbb, Gb=bbbbbb
    as above, notating in the treble clef=Bb, Eb, Ab, Db, Gb, Cb

    This is pretty basic stuff, and if you don't have a book with it in there, you need to get one right away! Good trumpet players know their scales!
     
  5. bilboboone

    bilboboone New Friend

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    Mar 13, 2007
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    I found that for me personally and the beginner students I teach that learning the Circle/Cycle of 4th/5ths is the best way to learn scales. You can use this tool to easily figure out the number of sharps/flats in each key as well as what those flats/sharps are. It also teaches them the connection between the scales and gets them used to moving in 4ths and 5ths.
    Here is a good link for learning the circle:
    http://www.jazzbooks.com/miva/documents/handbook/24_circle_of_fourths.pdf

    of course one can also figure any major scale out by starting on the root and following the major scale pattern: whole step, whole step, half step, whole step, whole step, whole step, half step.

    For me, conceptual learning has always been more effective than memorization.
    Boone
     
  6. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    The order of flats: "Bears, Elephants And Dogs Go Creeping Forward"
    The order of sharps: "Fair Cinderella Goes Down And Eats Bugs"
     
  7. Tom Mac

    Tom Mac Pianissimo User

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    I dont know about those bears and elephants but that bug eating thing does it for me.:lol:

    B :cool:

    T. Mac
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    That does it for me too. I always wondered why string players liked sharps!
     
  9. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    We were playing one of those famous Kalmus editions, and a key change to G major wasn't notated in the 1st trombone part. Thinking it was still in C, he played a beautiful F natural. Gunther Schuller, conducting, told him: "We're in G major now." Looking at his music in disbelief, the trombonist said: "G major, that's got one sharp, right?" For the rest of the orchestra, unaware of the copyist's mistake, our trombonist's rhetorical question confirmed everything everybody has ever thought about trombonists.
     

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