Scales

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trumpettrax, Apr 3, 2012.

  1. trumpettrax

    trumpettrax Piano User

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    OK, so I'm learning the 12 major scales and thier modes! When would you use one of the different modes and why? Take for instance the C scale. No sharps or flats right? so...... how does that change anything when playing a different mode?


    Trax
     
  2. acarcido

    acarcido Forte User

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    Do you mean modes as in Major/Minor scales?
     
  3. trumpettrax

    trumpettrax Piano User

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    I'm talking about the Dorian, Phrygian, Ionian modes etc.
     
  4. acarcido

    acarcido Forte User

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    The changes are infinite. Can you be more specific in your question? It appears to me that you are studying the various theories in music and application.
     
  5. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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    Dan Haerle has a great book called "Scales for Jazz Improvisation" that goes through all the scales in every mode and key... and the text explains what each mode does and why.

    example:
    F to F in the key of C has a B-natural instead of the normal Bb. When you play it the sound is different than a normal major scale. Over certain chords in a progression you will learn that sometimes a lydian scale works, or a dorian... etc..

    In regular music, composers will write passages that may not strictly be based on major scales. When you recognize the patterns and intervals in all the scale modes your sightreading will improve because you do not have to individually recognize each individual accidental if you can recognize that it is a scale mode and you know the pattern and intervals.
     
  6. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    Excellent book, which I own and use.

    Back to the OP's original question. I practice scales in all modes to help learn these scales and also to come up with patterns for improvisation. I do this for major scales, as you mentioned. But I also do it for other scales, like the blues scales, pentatonic scales, and super locrian scales. I also practice various 3 and 4 note patterns based on all of these scales.

    Mike
     
  7. trumpetup

    trumpetup Piano User

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    When you play in a different mode you are changing where the step/half step sequence of the scale (key) of the song fall, but don't change the key (sharps/flats). Play a song one step up or down from the written notes without changing the sharps or flats and you will see how it works. It has the same melody with a different feel.
    Hope that makes since.
    Bobby
     
  8. trumpettrax

    trumpettrax Piano User

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    Thanks so much for the responses. Thanks for the PM TrumpetMD. It does help. So, as a trumpeter, do I change the mode (as a soloist) by myself, or does the whole ensemble change at the same time.

    Example: I'm playing with a pianist. The pianist is playing (my) C Major, do we change modes together or would the pianist continue to play the Cmaj and I play/improvise in a different mode?

    Hope that makes sense. I'm trying to get all this in my head.

    Thanks for any help.
     
  9. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    Someone else may be able to explain this better.

    But to build on your example, I may pick a different mode that is compatible with the pianist. So if the pianist is play in C major, I may flip over to the phyrigian mode.

    More commonly, I may pick a compatible scale. So if the pianist is playing in C major, I may flip over to a C pentatonic scale.

    (I think Dan Haerle's book includes compatibility chart of what scales you can play over which chords.)

    Mike
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2012
  10. trumpettrax

    trumpettrax Piano User

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    Thanks
     

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