Schleuter Retirement

Discussion in 'Orchestra / Solo / Chamber Music' started by largo, Sep 28, 2005.

  1. largo

    largo New Friend

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    Sep 27, 2005
    First of all, my apologies to Robert White and others who were offended by my lack of professional courtesy regarding this matter. In a letter dated and posted yesterday at Symphony Hall, Charlie's retirement was announced effective at the end of the 2006 Tanglewood season. Again, my apologies for not getting the facts straight.
    Greg
     
  2. robertwhite

    robertwhite Mezzo Piano User

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    Nov 11, 2003
    No apologies necessary, Greg. Not knowing who you were, I just wanted to make sure I knew exactly what was up. Thanks, though, for bringing this news to light.

    Here's more info about Schlueter's retirement:
     
  3. dbacon

    dbacon Mezzo Piano User

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    Congratulations to one of the truly great virtuoso players of all time, Charles Schlueter! :play:
     
  4. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I'm curious - granted, 25 years in the principal slot of a major symphony orchestra is a long time, but is there main reason that he's stepping down? Is he having a hard time keeping up with the demands of the job, or does he simply wish to live and lounge? I mean, he's been playing professionally as his main gig since 1962 - 43 years is a pretty long time to do one job by any standard.

    Well, I hope he lives long and lives well, and that he enjoys the retirement that he has undoubtedly earned.
     
  5. tpter1

    tpter1 Forte User

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    I've read alot of news about Maestro Levine's demands on the orchestra.

    How much impact does this have on Mr. Schleuter's decision?
     
  6. dizforprez

    dizforprez Forte User

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    Nov 2, 2003

    Where have you read about those demands? online?

    I would be intrested in reading any articles if you could provide us wiht a link.
     
  7. tpter1

    tpter1 Forte User

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    I've seen alot mentioned at www.myauditions.com. They have daily headlines and news from the orchestral world. Great for those looking for perfoming jobs, too. There's nothing there right now on it, but past articles have described an increase in demand on the players in terms of rehearsal and performance schedules.

    Here's one, but it only vaguely touches on or hints at what must be going on within the performing personnel (paragraph 4...negotiated into the contract a "Levine Premium"). There were more telling stories, but I just can't seem to find them.
    http://www.boston.com/ae/music/articles/2005/09/25/the_cost_of_excellence/
     
  8. Jimi Michiel

    Jimi Michiel Forte User

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    If you look at the BSO schedule since Levine arrived, you will notice how long and physical some of the programs appear to be. I ushered for the BSO during Levine's first season and was there for most of his concerts. His programs ran longer and included many standard war horses as well some of the craziest "new music" around. Levine likes Ligeti and Harbison a lot more than Christopher Rouse and John Adams. They did a concert with Lynn Harrell that included cello concerti by Lutoslawski and Ligeti, and then capped it off with a Dvorak symphony (7 I think). The even did a complete concert performance of The Flying Dutchman. The year before there was a complete concert performance of Debussy's Pelleas and Mellisande.
    Sometime last spring, an article in the Boston Globe came out about how Levine's programming was having an affect on the orchestra. It noted that one violinist who was planning to retire at the end had to retire halfway through the season because the rehearsals for these programs were so physically daunting. The article said that many other string players were also having problems and that a performance health specialist was being brought in to help with physical problems (MinnOrch's own Janet Horvath, a world renowned specialist with physical problems related to musical performance).
    That having been said, it didn't seem like any of the brass players seemed to have any problems. If anything, I think they improved when Levine came.
    OK, thats my take. Keep in mind that these are the opinions and observations of someone who probably wouldn't make it through 5 minutes of BSO level playing...
    -Jimi
     

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